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Clarinet?

PolkatPolkat Chico, CANew
edited October 2011 in Woodwinds Posts: 119
Not sure where to put this, so I'll try here.

The instrument section has violin, bass, accordian, etc. As I see it, when a violin was missing, a clarinet most often filled the hole, so why not a place in the instrument section for the clarinet?
Violin's swing the best!
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Comments

  • MichaelHorowitzMichaelHorowitz SeattleAdministrator
    Posts: 6,155
    We had one years ago but due to lack of posts it was canned.
  • klaatuklaatu Nova ScotiaProdigy Rodrigo Shopis D'Artagnan, 1950s Jacques Castelluccia
    Posts: 1,665
    Michael, I wonder if it would be worthwhile to try again. There have been some recent requests for this, and I know my band's new clarinet player would be interested. We're also hoping for a clarinet section at Django in June someday.
    Benny

    "It's a great feeling to be dealing with material which is better than yourself, that you know you can never live up to."
    -- Orson Welles
  • I would be pleased to help in any way I can although I would prefer it to be a woodwind section as I play sax (soprano) :D
    The Magic really starts to happen when you can play it with your eyes closed
  • MichaelHorowitzMichaelHorowitz SeattleAdministrator
    Posts: 6,155
    Congratulations, you are now a moderator!

    viewforum.php?f=35
  • PolkatPolkat Chico, CANew
    Posts: 119
    Okay, here's a rather amatuer question I guess. I've been playing jazz violin for a number of years now, and am only just approaching the clarinet. While I have some past experience (wayyy past) playing tenor sax, I am wondering what type of clarinet to learn with the same kind of music. Clarinets come in Bb, Eb, and a few others. I'm guessing that Bb is the one to go for, but what have others used in swing jazz?
    Violin's swing the best!
  • JazzmanJazzman Halifax, Nova ScotiaNew
    Posts: 7
    You're going to almost certainly be interested in the Bb soprano clarinet. That will cover 95% of swing jazz --Gypsy or otherwise. The A and Eb horns are used occasionally for classical or orchestral work. Recently (in the last 15 or so years) jazzers have started to use the bass clarinet some, but that would be an oddity in a vintage jazz ensemble. One last very minor bit: In early jazz, (ie. Chicago style or Dixie) one will occasionally find players using instruments built on an archaic key system -- called the "Albert" style. These clarinets are still Bb, but have a slightly darker, woodier, tone. I'd love to try one of these some day, but you'll almost surely want the modern, "Bohem" style instrument.

    Phew! More than you probably wanted to know, eh?
  • PolkatPolkat Chico, CANew
    Posts: 119
    No. Good stuff actually. The more I learn up front, the better. Are the Albert style instruments still keyed the same way?
    Violin's swing the best!
  • JazzmanJazzman Halifax, Nova ScotiaNew
    Posts: 7
    Albert horns have a simpler physical key & fingering structure than Bohem clarinets. The disadvantages are fewer alternate fingerings for some notes. Some players claim therefor, that the Bohem system allows for playing faster passages. Of course, like anything relatively rare and unusual, there's fewer people to teach how to play, fix, Alberts, etc., etc --- and you'd almost surely be playing a vintage instrument -- with all the :D s and :( s that entails. But the advantage is the slightly darker tone which some prefer. You'll find oodles of info by googling "Albert vs Bohem."

    But Polkat, don't get distracted. Albert system horns are a small and arcane corner of your new clarinet world. Nearly all the recordings you're enjoying listening to are made by Bohem players.

    If you're thinking 'bout starting to play, get a teacher that you trust. Also when selecting a horn, a good mouthpiece + mediocre horn is better than poor mouthpiece + excellent horn. Get it? Mouthpiece is all-important, and the best way to find one you like is by play-testing a bunch in a good music store.
  • PolkatPolkat Chico, CANew
    Posts: 119
    Thanks for the advice jazzman. Someone gave me an unused (still sealed!) Smart Pak which includes a mouthpiece, grease, protective cover and a few reeds. It's made by a company called Rico. Any good?
    Violin's swing the best!
  • JazzmanJazzman Halifax, Nova ScotiaNew
    Posts: 7
    Well... rather than answer your question directly, allow me to invite you to this page on my website, which begins with my effort at placing the relative importance on "gear" for a musician.
    http://www.johnmalmstrom.com/about-the-man/my-instruments-2/

    I hope this discussion is of value to others! Enjoying our give & take, Polkat.
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