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FEgger FannieTall

Django's Pick Revealed!!

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Comments

  • JackJack western Massachusetts✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 1,911
    i think we're all totally confused!! ha ha

    I think this is the sort of thing that needs to be demonstrated in person.

    The bevel on the Button pick is just a more extreme version of the Gypsy jazz pick. The Gypsy jazz pick is also beveled on the back side so that you get a smooth up stroke.

    Jack...i think attacking the string at the angle in diagram #2 is not ideal. You want more of a diagonal, 45 degree angle of attack. It's much smoother...although the button pick is so worn that it doesn't matter as much. Once you get control over the pick angle, you can make even a cheap, thin plastic pick sound great!

    'm

    Sorry for the confusion-I was writing my post when 'a' posted his last one. I agree with you about the 'more extreme' bevel making angle less important-what I meant was that if you hold it more or less as in ex.2, you maximize the amount of bevel that's hitting the string. It's great that way for tremelo (you get that 'swoosh' you've mentioned before) and general rhythm, but not much else (it was designed for rhythm playing, right?). That's one reason I don't use mine much, in fact-but the bigger issue is that it's a bit too small for my grip. For more on the history of the 'Button':
    http://www.hotclub.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1720
    (The other site mentioned there is the Yahoo group, not this fine joint.)
    Once you get control over the pick angle, you can make even a cheap, thin plastic pick sound great!

    Agreed!

    All best,
    Jack.
  • emicademicad Rome - ItalyModerator
    edited February 2006 Posts: 472
    trumbology wrote:
    That letter is a charming artifact in itself.

    I'm going out looking for some of that spaghetti fork material today (they haven't been declared endangered yet, have they?). I think it's going to bring a nice Neopolitan vibe to my sound.

    Thanks for posting it.

    n
    I'm italian and I've never seen plastic spaghetti forks usable for picks!!! :shock:
  • emicademicad Rome - ItalyModerator
    Posts: 472
    So, finally, what's the now avaliable pick most similar to the Django's pick?
    Is it the button?
    It can be great to have dimensions, thickness and all the rest to try working on it.
  • MichaelHorowitzMichaelHorowitz SeattleAdministrator
    Posts: 5,813
    I'd say the button is the closest...

    'm
  • emicademicad Rome - ItalyModerator
    Posts: 472
    I'd say the button is the closest...

    'm
    Thanks
    Seems is not very diffused pick, expecially between solo players...
    Why?
  • richdaiglerichdaigle SLC,UT✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 181
    I love this topic, I thought I'd add this little nugget I found

    http://www.art-ecaille.com/turtle-shell-EN/plectrum.htm
  • MichaelHorowitzMichaelHorowitz SeattleAdministrator
    Posts: 5,813
    emicad wrote:
    I'd say the button is the closest...

    'm
    Thanks
    Seems is not very diffused pick, expecially between solo players...
    Why?

    The old Selmers were so bright and harsh, I think a very rounded edge was essential to bring out some warmth from the instrument. Modern instruments are much more balanced...but need a more pointy pick to get volume and attack.

    Just a theory...
    Nejc
  • aa New York City✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 800
    i'm not sure that having a hard pick is that desirable when using this technique. if anything, wouldn't it make more sense to have a pick the that has a surface that slightly grabs the string- this would create more friction and tone. maybe something sort rubbery or gummy (but stiff)? something like the jazztone by dunlop..?
    Www.alexsimonmusic.com
    Learn how to play Gypsy guitar:
    http://alexsimonmusic.com/learn-gypsy-jazz-guitar/
  • guit_boxguit_box New
    Posts: 113
    I'd like to get the button, but I don't like that it only comes in 5mm. I've been exclusively using the 3.5mm twins. Can you recommend a button style pick that comes in 3.5 mm? You were saying that many famous gypsy guitarists were using very worn picks, where they also this thick?
  • MichaelHorowitzMichaelHorowitz SeattleAdministrator
    Posts: 5,813
    guit_box wrote:
    You were saying that many famous gypsy guitarists were using very worn picks, where they also this thick?

    Sometimes...Paulus Schaefer was using an absolutely huge bone pick...so was the outstanding rhythm player Martin Limberger. But Fapy used a Tortoise 4mm very similar to the Moustache. That's the most traditional Django sound in my opinion. Stochelo was using a small 2mm piece of Tortoise for more bite and control.

    'm
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