DjangoBooks.com

Theory and Learning Rhythm; ear training; approach to learning chord transcriptions.

124»

Comments

  • PassacagliaPassacaglia Madison, WI✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 1,471

    Wim, you mean the way they were playing the "non-magic" progression to demonstrate "too much movement" was your first set, and the magic is the second set?

    -Paul

    pas encore, j'erre toujours.
  • wimwim ChicagoModerator Barault #503 replica
    edited June 2020 Posts: 1,459

    Nope. I've only transcribed what Samy plays, I wrote out the one A section of Daphne (8 bars, with 2 beats per chord).

    The economy of motion is not from special voicings (actually he just uses typical and simple GJ voicings), it's from substitutions - playing 1 1 4 5 instead of 1 6 2 5. "Too much movement" that they showed here is just demonstrating taking "1 6 2 5" too literally, which doesn't work very well in up tempo GJ tunes.

    I have somewhere a video of Nousche doing similar as Samy does here, different voicings though. He sounds so great, I actually got a slow-mo of it too! I'll see if I can dig it out..

    Passacaglia
  • PassacagliaPassacaglia Madison, WI✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 1,471

    OK, thanks Wim. I thought I saw a typical 1 6 2 5, but will have to watch again and try it this way. Never seen this. Is this common, 1 1 4 5, in place of the "standard" progession?

    -Paul

    pas encore, j'erre toujours.
  • wimwim ChicagoModerator Barault #503 replica
    edited June 2020 Posts: 1,459

    It's a common simplification to just play I I V V and this one is a slight variation on that. You could think of the 4 instead like a 5 "sus" chord where the third is raised a semitone and then falls down (a very familiar sound in pop music). Another common low-movement way to do 1625 up-tempo is with tritone subs for the dominant, e.g. in double scotch just C C Db7 Db7.

    You might also notice that both the substitutions are the relative major e.g. D for Bmin, and G for Emin, but I think that's not as useful (from an improvisation standpoint) as just thinking in terms of dominant and tonic / question and answer / tension and release.

    BonesrudolfochristPassacaglia
  • PassacagliaPassacaglia Madison, WI✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 1,471

    Thanks Wim. This may be well known to most but new to me, and very fascinating. One of the reasons, I suppose, why I'd like a better understanding of at least some theory.

    -Paul

    pas encore, j'erre toujours.
  • PassacagliaPassacaglia Madison, WI✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 1,471

    FWIW, in going through the forum looking up "Samy"**, I see this "Magic Chord" thing was covered before. In case anyone's interested.


    **trying to find info on the books - are these the "astuces" with Angelo, plus Samy's 2 books here? Wim, you mentioned 5 books - I see 4 on Michael's store. Thoughts on any of these for someone never having tried lead, but wanting to learn, this time, however limited)?

    -Paul

    pas encore, j'erre toujours.
  • AnishzAnishz New
    Posts: 1

    When I started learning the chords of guitar, my father told me Its very important to hear the chords while playing because it helps in future as well.. Anytime we hear new chords and we like it, we can recall & play it later and this is only possible if we are able to know which chord is played just by hearing it..

    Thanks to my father who taught me this in the beginning of my journey of learning chords.

    Buco
Sign In or Register to comment.
Home  |  Forum  |  Blog  |  Contact  |  206-528-9873
The Premier Gypsy Jazz Marketplace
DjangoBooks.com
USD CAD GBP EUR AUD
USD CAD GBP EUR AUD
Banner Adverts
Sell Your Guitar
© 2024 DjangoBooks.com, all rights reserved worldwide.
Software: Kryptronic eCommerce, Copyright 1999-2024 Kryptronic, Inc. Exec Time: 0.039558 Seconds Memory Usage: 2.681549 Megabytes
Kryptronic