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Daily Practice?

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  • pmgpmg Atherton, CANew Dupont MD50R, Shelley Park Custom, Super 400, 68 Les Paul Deluxe, Stevie Ray Strat
    Posts: 140

    Re/ Zoom and Skype Lessons

    There are many terrific gypsy jazz teachers and performers who are now doing on-line lessons to supplement income. I highly recommend that you start with Dennis Chang, If he is booked up, reach out to other good players that you admire and inquire. Remember that great players are not always great teachers - so best to start with someone who has a significant history teaching with good student testimonials.

    Elroy Montano
    I'm always interested in jamming with experienced jazz and gypsy jazz players in the San Francisco - San Jose area. Drop me a line. Bass players welcome!
  • Posts: 20

    Noted on this @pmg ! will start searching :)

  • pmgpmg Atherton, CANew Dupont MD50R, Shelley Park Custom, Super 400, 68 Les Paul Deluxe, Stevie Ray Strat
    Posts: 140

    Re/ Bill Evans

    One of the greats for sure. His playing style often exploits superimposing triads at the same time to produce interesting harmonic colors. A lot of modern jazz guitar players do this including George Benson, Pat Matheny, and many others. Not very common in gypsy jazz however.

    Elroy Montano
    I'm always interested in jamming with experienced jazz and gypsy jazz players in the San Francisco - San Jose area. Drop me a line. Bass players welcome!
  • Lango-DjangoLango-Django Niagara-On-The-Lake, ONModerator
    edited June 2020 Posts: 1,790

    Hate to brag, but the Will Wilson Practice Method is perfect for underachievers...

    https://www.djangobooks.com/forum/discussion/comment/101546#Comment_101546

    Passacaglia
    Paul Cezanne: "I could paint for a thousand years without stopping and I would still feel as though I knew nothing."

    Edgar Degas: "Only when he no longer knows what he is doing does the painter do good things.... To draw, you must close your eyes and sing."

    Georges Braque: "In art there is only one thing that counts: the bit that can’t be explained."
  • PassacagliaPassacaglia Madison, WI✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 1,471

    I tried it will, but the only thing I accomplished was a fascination with how many ants where marching across that sidewalk. Over there. I guess they had a kind of rhythm..?

    Buco
    -Paul

    pas encore, j'erre toujours.
  • Lango-DjangoLango-Django Niagara-On-The-Lake, ONModerator
    Posts: 1,790

    So i hope you played “The Ants Go Marching Two By Two” for them?

    PassacagliaBucomac63000
    Paul Cezanne: "I could paint for a thousand years without stopping and I would still feel as though I knew nothing."

    Edgar Degas: "Only when he no longer knows what he is doing does the painter do good things.... To draw, you must close your eyes and sing."

    Georges Braque: "In art there is only one thing that counts: the bit that can’t be explained."
  • guitarmikeguitarmike Montreal, Quebec✭✭ Old French Gypsy Guitar
    Posts: 87

    Famous Wes Montgomery's quote :

    I never practice my guitar- from time to time I just open the case and throw in a piece of raw meat.

    mac63000
  • I'm doing daily maintenance now that incorporates elements from the following:

    Warm-Up - there is a ton of stuff out there. I use some waltzes or other musical exercises with the intention of getting through these as slow as possible without making mistakes. If I've made a mistake, I focus on that area. I saw someone doing Wally's Waltz by Johnny Smith (not in this style) as an exercise and have been using that one as a warmup: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z5Uvzkp-GJc

    I think it can be a good exercise for finger placement and picking (choose your method). I use it for rest stroke now. Any of the classic waltzes can be used.

    Triads - I 'll run triads in various ways through a song form limiting myself to the top 4 strings. Then I'll do some improve using these triad forms. Sometimes with approach notes, sometimes with motif development within a particular position.

    Arpeggios/Scales _ I'll run these through progressions in some form. Maybe straight, maybe thirds. Maybe arpeggio ascending and scale descending.

    Chord melodies - I try to work at least one song through a rudimentary chord melody a day. If I have time, I'll try to do it through different positions. I do this mainly to see stuff better in different areas.

    Transcription - licks, lines, or solos. for the first two, I try to learn in multiple positions and run through all keys and then apply into songs. With full solos (once I've learned), I break them down into licks or lines and run through the solo line by line transcribing each idea into all keys in order.

    Free play - play over progressions or just play free.

    All ideas are basically run through songs, always. I combine efforts sometimes using a new tune in this whole thing.

    It's not perfect, but it has helped me.

    PassacagliaBucoElroy Montano
  • edited June 2020 Posts: 4,022

    This is the list I compiled over the years, of course not a daily routine but just something I draw from:

    "Practice This:

    Tone: play one note, listen

    Following changes

    Continuous notes throughout (8th notes is the goal but whatever to begin with: 1/2 or 1/4)

    Licks: my own, play in different keys

    Learn licks I hear and like

    Adapt a lick to maj, min, dom chords

    Licks in different positions/octaves

    Ending phrases on b5, 9, 6

    3 notes per string ascending phrases

    Chord melodies

    Music reading

    Play through a song and target: 3 or 5 or 7 on each chord

    Inversions: learn basics, put it in a song, make up a bass line then put the chords below

    Melodic minor scale

    Harmonic minor scale

    Bebop scale

    Various blues forms, in different keys

    Rhythm changes in different keys

    Soloing over open strings

    Phrasing like Louis: long-short, behind-on

    Arpeggios over the song making sure to connect them, start with the first chord then use inversions to stay in the same position

    Add "wrong" note into the lick, arpeggio etc...then resolve it

    Start on diminished arp then resolve to major tonality

    Look at soloing through the shapes (CAGED)

    Anticipate the next chord

    Transcribe short phrases I like and practice over several weeks eventually personalizing it

    Question and response concept when soloing

    Lick that's in the key, change a note to make it weird, minor 3rd (when the lick is major), then resolve

    Make short and simple statements between longer lines"

    PS the picture is from "Practice of Practice" book

    mac63000Jim Kaznosky
    Every note wants to go somewhere-Kurt Rosenwinkel
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