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Theory books - classical guitar

NejcNejc Slovenia✭✭ Altamira M01
in Welcome Posts: 98
So I have been playing the guitar for almost half of my life now as an amateur. A year ago I jumped into gypsy jazz, or should I call it swing manouche. I was always intrigued by the way Django played his guitar especially on his improvisations. And now I am wondering if anyone here could recommend me any good books focusing more on the theory for classical guitar. I never took any lessons and I feel that I am really lacking on the theory behind it.
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Comments

  • pickitjohnpickitjohn South Texas Corpus, San Antonio, AustinVirtuoso Patenotte 260
    Posts: 936
    Classical Guitar?

    How about Guitar Theory.

    Fretboard-toolbox.com has got some interesting packages for checking out.

    Lot's of free stuff to check out.
    Maybe of use to you.
    Good Luck

    :)>-
    Nejc
  • Do you intend to learn classical fingerstyle picking or music theory.....confused I am
    The Magic really starts to happen when you can play it with your eyes closed
  • NejcNejc Slovenia✭✭ Altamira M01
    edited February 2016 Posts: 98
    I apologize for the confusion I just realized I have made! I wanted to say that for me the way Django approached his improvisations reminded me more of a way a classical guitarist would have played it. I have no intention in using fingerstyle or a classical guitar, I used it just as a reference (had a long day behind me yesterday and now I can see I wrote it in a confusing way).

    I am searching for guitar theory books focused more on approaching classical pieces instead of jazz standards.
  • NejcNejc Slovenia✭✭ Altamira M01
    Posts: 98
    Nejc wrote: »

    I am searching for guitar theory books focused more on approaching classical pieces.

    I meant music theory books.

  • Lango-DjangoLango-Django Niagara-On-The-Lake, ONModerator
    Posts: 1,789
    Just speaking for myself here, but I don't believe this kind of music requires a great amount of theoretical knowledge about music theory.

    A knowledge of commonly-used chords and chord progressions for jazz and pop standards would be useful, of course. And a thorough knowledge of arpeggios.

    In my opinion, you would do better by purchasing some of the many excellent instructional materials available at this site, beginning with Michael Horowitz's "Gypsy Picking".

    By the way, many of the regulars at this site have differences of opinion about Django's own knowledge of music theory, which is a bit mysterious.

    He was close to being illiterate, did not read or write music, and was never known for discussing music or music theory with his peers... and yet, listen to what he played!!!

    Will
    Nejc
    Paul Cezanne: "I could paint for a thousand years without stopping and I would still feel as though I knew nothing."

    Edgar Degas: "Only when he no longer knows what he is doing does the painter do good things.... To draw, you must close your eyes and sing."

    Georges Braque: "In art there is only one thing that counts: the bit that can’t be explained."
  • NejcNejc Slovenia✭✭ Altamira M01
    Posts: 98
    The thing is since I spend a lot of money for the study I dont have much left to buy a book online just to find out later its not what I was looking for. Thats why I decided to ask here for any recommendations since I found the people on this forum to be more trust worthy than in other forums. I agree with you and I know that lots of really good players dont know that much about music theory, its something that you achieve with a lot of practice through the years and years of playing. I've read two of the Ted Greene books about chords chemistry and found then to be very informative. It was him that in a way got me interested more in the theoreticall stuff since I saw a couple of videos of him on yt talking about theory while playing.
  • NejcNejc Slovenia✭✭ Altamira M01
    edited February 2016 Posts: 98
    There is a channel on yt with Ted Greene videos, I know he is highly respected in the guitar world, just thought to post this video here if anyone is interested to take a look:

  • edited February 2016 Posts: 3,707
    Of al the theory books I have on my shelf, (all 10 feet of music books theory jazz theory arranging zzzzzzzzzzz jazz classical) etc by far the most useful for those not wanting to arrange or write is

    A player's guide to chords and harmony by Jim Aiken. Music theory for real world musicians.


    IMO ...... Everything you will ever really need to know.

    Available from backbeat music. Sometime ago I suggested it to Michael so you might check with him.
    Nejc
    The Magic really starts to happen when you can play it with your eyes closed
  • NejcNejc Slovenia✭✭ Altamira M01
    Posts: 98
    Thank you! Gonna contact Michael to see if I can order it from him.
  • pickitjohnpickitjohn South Texas Corpus, San Antonio, AustinVirtuoso Patenotte 260
    Posts: 936
    @Jazzaferri said...
    A player's guide to chords and harmony by Jim Aiken. Music theory for real world musicians.

    "I'll be 67 next month and never learned to read music, but I can hear it."

    That book is in a FOREIGN LANGUAGE to me.

    My musical path seems more INTERVAL driven.

    There's a good reference and discussion here...

    http://www.apianotuner.com/ChordNotation/ChordNotation.htm

    Aaron Walker A member here @kungfumonk007 has posted some wonderfully helpful video's on Youtube. THANKS Aaron much appreciated
    :-c



    Fretboard-toolbox had this PDF that is helpful to me.

    :)>-
    Nejc
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