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Bandmate Issues

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  • If a balanced lead volume is too loud when playing rhythm...why not have him try a novel solution, chord more quitely.
    The Magic really starts to happen when you can play it with your eyes closed
  • stuologystuology New
    Posts: 34
    My advice is - don't worry about it. Focus on your own playing and enjoy hanging out playing the music you love with other people who also enjoy it. I've been in too many bands that have split up over things like this and my philosophy these days in the band I'm in is no one tells anyone else what to play or how to play. Sure, the music could be a lot better but we're not trying to do anything other than enjoy ourselves and that must count for something because we always seem to get bigger audiences than the bands that can really play.
  • psychebillypsychebilly Kentucky, USA
    Posts: 34
    Jazzaferri wrote: »
    If a balanced lead volume is too loud when playing rhythm...why not have him try a novel solution, chord more quitely.

    As simple as this sounds, this is the way to go, IMHO.

    When my merry band of gentlemen got together to rehearse early on, we wanted our bass player to take solo's. An upright bass doesn't exactly cut through the mix, so both myself and the other guitarist pulled back our rhythm so the bass player could be heard. In fact, the way things have evolved is that I play a straight 'la pompe' at a reasonable volume for the bass to be heard, while the other guitar player sits out completely, or plays quiet ornamental chords/extensions while the bass player solo's. We do that for each soloist. It's just basically musical respect for the soloist. Maybe it's musical maturity.

    IMHO, if you are playing rhythm for a soloist, if you can't hear the soloist over your rhythm playing, it's YOUR job to reduce volume, not the soloist's job to increase his volume.
    JoseBones
    Creativity is knowing how to hide your sources.
  • Lango-DjangoLango-Django Niagara-On-The-Lake, ONModerator
    Posts: 1,332
    Ooh, those look nice! I’ve been using a big clunky volume pedal!

    I’m on holidays right now but will contact you when I get back for more info!
    I live in a little tourist town called Niagara-On-The-Lake, Ontario, Canada, which is about twenty miles north of Niagara Falls.

    If you are ever planning on visiting the beautiful Niagara area, feel free to PM me and perhaps we can get together and do some jamming.
  • BonesBones Moderator
    Posts: 2,692
    Dang Will, seems like u r always on holiday! :-)

    I'm jealous....
    Buco
  • Lango-DjangoLango-Django Niagara-On-The-Lake, ONModerator
    Posts: 1,332
    Wait till you’re my age, young fella!
    BucoBones
    I live in a little tourist town called Niagara-On-The-Lake, Ontario, Canada, which is about twenty miles north of Niagara Falls.

    If you are ever planning on visiting the beautiful Niagara area, feel free to PM me and perhaps we can get together and do some jamming.
  • constantineconstantine New York✭✭✭✭ Stringphonic
    Posts: 377
    Videotape a few performances and share results with the band.
  • therealguyfitherealguyfi Milwaukee, WINew Dell Arte Hommage oval
    edited December 2018 Posts: 23
    There have been some really good points made here in terms of volume and playing and how it impacts the music overall. My concept as a rhythm player is to always play UNDER the soloist (the same way I would a singer); if the soloist isn't coming through I play quieter. In Milwaukee Hot Club one of the guitars generally sits out on the bass solos. Music needs dynamics and this has to start in the mind of the player before you even consider gear.

    Having said that I think it's also worth recognizing that on Django's recordings he's usually mixed way in front of the rhythm players, and in the many groups that have a dedicated rhythm player they are usually mixed back. Once on a Robin Nolan show I set up, his bassist told me to make him twice as loud as Kevin. While this is only one approach it does give the soloist a great deal of headroom where they don't have to play everything super hard just to cut through, and through their dynamic range they can take the whole band through different dynamics.

    Also, being able to control your volume electronically gives the rhythm player options: you can have the bright tone that attacking the strings a little harder gives you and still be back. Also, when you play rhythm with your fingers (idk what you call it but like on Gonzalo's "Como Una Flor") you can play softly and still be heard.

    This works really well in our band where both guitarists solo. We might be a bit louder than the typical GJ group because we have a tenor sax (louder acoustically than a guitar or violin) which raises our dynamic.

    In terms of band members who won't change, I've been in this situation many times (and may have been "that guy" once or twice)....it's a difficult life lesson. You may have to let go of the ideal and learn to work with what you have (focus on the positives!!) at least until you find another candidate or decide that it's more hassle than it's worth...but do try to communicate. You mentioned him leaning on the pickup rather than technique, maybe he's struggling with this and trying to figure it out, most of us can relate to that...for me, until very recently, I often felt like I couldn't project. I've come to realize that using a lighter touch, getting off the string quicker, produces a lot more sound...but this is for another thread.
    Jose
  • jonpowljonpowl Santa Cruz, CA✭✭✭ Dupont MD-100, Cigano GJ-10
    Posts: 538
    Just curious, does your bandmate or his friends read the forum posts at Djangobooks? Another idea is to get a respected guitarist to stop by to see if he thinks the volume is out of sync.
  • I playing dynamically is a challenge, there is always the footpedal route. Set it maxed to a fff level then adjust as necessary to utilize dynamics artistically
    Matteo
    The Magic really starts to happen when you can play it with your eyes closed
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