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Gypsy Rhythm Coming Soon!

MichaelHorowitzMichaelHorowitz SeattleAdministrator
edited April 2006 in Gypsy Rhythm Posts: 5,775
HI all,

After over two years of work the Gypsy Rhythm book is finnaly almost done! It was planned as a 100 p. book, but grew to nearly 500 pages so will now be 3 volumes.

I'm hoping to have the 1st volume done by around x-mas. Here's TOC:

Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction

Part 1: Gypsy Jazz

Part 2: Fundamentals

Part 3: Basic and Intermediate Chords

-Basic Chords
-Intermediate Chords
-Three Note Chords

Part 4: Basic Rhythms

-Flat Four
-La pompe

Part 5: La Pompe Styles

-Traditional
-Paris Style
-Pompe Four
-German Style
-Dutch Style
-Gypsy Bop

Part 6: Advanced Harmonic Techniques

-Advanced Chords
-Multipurpose Chord Shapes
-V-I and ii-V-I
-Chord Enclosures
-Turn-Arounds
-Major
-Major Django Changes
-Coltrane Changes
-Minor
-Minor Django Changes
-Line Clichés
-Major
-Minor
-Dominant
-Chord Substitutions
-Tritone Substituion
-V into ii-V
-Deceptive Cadences
-Pedal Point
-Review: Oh! Lady Be Good

Part 7: Advanced Rhythmic Techniques

-Shuffle
-Hits
-Rolls
-Triplets
-Double Time
-Tremolo
-Syncopation
-Review: I’ll See You in My Dreams

Part 8: Bass and Chords

-Review: All of Me

Part 9: Comping

-Comping Rhythms
-Chord Scales
-Riffs
-Unison
-Tremolo Turn Arounds
-Turn Around Runs
-Review: All of Me

Part 10: Transcriptions

Minor Swing

-Basic (1937 - Melody)
-Intermediate
-Advanced
-Modern
-Comping

Djangology

-Basic (1935 - Melody)
-Advanced
-Modern
-Comping (1949)


Dark Eyes

-Basic (1940 - Melody)
-1947
-Advanced
-Modern
-Bass and Chord (1947)
-Comping (1950)

Out Of Nowhere

-Basic (Melody)
-Advanced Duet (1939)

Honeysuckle Rose

-Basic (1938)
-Advanced
-Modern
-Comping (1949)


I’ve Found a New Baby

-Basic (1935 - Melody)
-Advanced Duet (1937)


Douce Ambiance

-Basic (1943 – Melody)
-Advanced
-Modern


Night and Day

-Basic (1938 – Melody)
-Advanced Duet (Stochelo Rosenberg)
-Modern
-Comping (1949)

Appendix

Modern Chords

Three Note Chords

Four Note Chords

Notation Legend

Current and forthcoming Releases



The first volume will be around 250 pages. The next two volumes will discuss special forms like Blues and Rhythm Changes. Ballads, Latin styles, waltzes, and more will also be covered.

Thanks!

'm
«134

Comments

  • zavzav Geneve, SwissNew
    Posts: 94
    WOW!

    There are a lot of harmony books, but it's extremly interesting to look on the subject from Gypsy Jazz point of view as well as read about specifics of the playing technique itself (not mention transcriptions etc)!

    Waiting for release,
    Anton
  • MichaelHorowitzMichaelHorowitz SeattleAdministrator
    Posts: 5,775
    zav wrote:
    WOW!

    There are a lot of harmony books, but it's extremly interesting to look on the subject from Gypsy Jazz point of view as well as read about specifics of the playing technique itself (not mention transcriptions etc)!

    Waiting for release,
    Anton

    That's the thing....I had all the formal training in Classical and Jazz theory. Problem is, that if you try to play Gypsy jazz using what's in most jazz theory and chord books you're not really playing in the "tradition." There' a unique swing era approach to chords, and an even more unique Gypsy approach so that 's what the book tries to document. I also included more modern approaches which Gypsies use...hence the Coltrane changes, etc.

    'm
  • CalebFSUCalebFSU Tallahassee, FLModerator Made in USA Dell Arte Hommage
    Posts: 557
    I can't wait to see the section on 'Trane Changes
    Hard work beats talent, when talent doesn't work hard.
  • MichaelHorowitzMichaelHorowitz SeattleAdministrator
    Posts: 5,775
    CalebFSU wrote:
    I can't wait to see the section on 'Trane Changes

    Those are cool...but I think the "Django Changes" are some of the coolest devices in the book!

    'm
  • aa New York City✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 800
    There' a unique swing era approach to chords, and an even more unique Gypsy approach so that 's what the book tries to document.

    when i was younger, i played and studied straight ahead stuff for a while, but eventually dropped it because i couldn't stand the cerebral part of it (i guess my mind was to slow/stubborn or i couldn't feel it or something). i remember thinking that i just wanted to play the guitar, and unlearn the jazz theory, scales, etc. i wanted to get to a place where i could just play whatever i was feeling, without thinking so much. it's now ten years later, and i've been playing django stuff for about half a year. it's really strange how much the "gypsy jazz" approach is giving me all that freedom that i had yearned for years back (in myriad ways). actually, learning gj has made it easier for me to appreciate what the bop guys were doing, and the type of history they were building on. it's been like discovering the missing link. i'm surprised that most jazz teachers don't start their guitar students with django. anyway, looking forward to the book. [/quote]
    Www.alexsimonmusic.com
    Learn how to play Gypsy guitar:
    http://alexsimonmusic.com/learn-gypsy-jazz-guitar/
  • zavzav Geneve, SwissNew
    Posts: 94
    if you try to play Gypsy jazz using what's in most jazz theory and chord books you're not really playing in the "tradition."

    But now I could say, that the benefit is NOT only playing "in tradition", but it leads to more melodical/intuitive way of thinking and playing in general, and that's is superb.

    i couldn't stand the cerebral part of it (i guess my mind was to slow/stubborn or i couldn't feel it or something).

    a, you are right!

    After reading some Joe Pass books - every time I'm listen to him it seems that he really did constantly thinking in terms of all that b5 #9 b11 #13 when playing - well.... the result is great (although, sometimes little bit formal for my taste :wink: ), but imo you need to have a Pentium - V computer instead of your head to do all that in more or less high speed....
    i'm surprised that most jazz teachers don't start their guitar students with django. anyway, looking forward to the book.

    Yeah... Right now i'm reading VERY nice harmony/chord book, that contains a material that imho covers some aspects of Gypsy Jazz approach, and there are a lot of great jazz guitarists mentioned in it (as an example), but no Django....... :roll:

    Looking forward to the book!
    Anton
  • dennisdennis Montreal, QuebecModerator
    Posts: 2,027
  • aa New York City✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 800
    After reading some Joe Pass books - every time I'm listen to him it seems that he really did constantly thinking in terms of all that b5 #9 b11 #13 when playing - well.... the result is great (although, sometimes little bit formal for my taste Wink ), but imo you need to have a Pentium - V computer instead of your head to do all that in more or less high speed....

    yeah, pass never got me going. compare all that to bach...bach isn't that cerebral, but his musical thought is so strong and well articulated, that it feels like he's sitting in the room with you. same with django or bird.[/list]
    Www.alexsimonmusic.com
    Learn how to play Gypsy guitar:
    http://alexsimonmusic.com/learn-gypsy-jazz-guitar/
  • dennisdennis Montreal, QuebecModerator
    Posts: 2,027
    although i haven't studied joe pass too much, i noticed from the few solos that i've transcribed , that his lines are "perfect" in that they follow the changes very clearly and perfectly which some people might consider mechanical, but i think they sound great.
  • bbwood_98bbwood_98 Brooklyn, NyProdigy Vladimir music! Les Effes. . Its the best!
    Posts: 421
    Wow- I for sure want this one!!!
    that looks great Michael!
    Soo cool!

    joe was one of the great improvisers ever; his use of alterations was very specific, and somewhat consistant- not that he worked it all out, but just added those ideas to his rep- and did them without much thinking about it . . . . because he liked the sound or they expressed something he wanted to get out.

    Dennis- right on!
    B.
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