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Django in June 2018 Artists

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  • Andrew UlleAndrew Ulle Cleveland, OH✭✭✭ Antoine DiMauro modele Django
    Posts: 463
    If they held this somewhere on Cape Cod or the like, I could convince my family to use our vacation time on DiJ. They could hang at the beach while I pretend to jam. Alas, that won't happen.
    Jim Kaznosky
  • AndrewLawrenceAndrewLawrence Northampton, MA✭✭
    Posts: 44

    For the record, no one person's experience at the camp is more important than any others.

    Hope to see you all again this year.

    Jim

    True enough, Jim...hope to see you, too!
    Cheers,
    ~Andrew
    Jim KaznoskyDarius-Scheider
  • edited January 2018 Posts: 3,707
    @AndrewLawrence I think your concept of group teaching to the same levels is the best one can do in a group lesson format.

    I completely agree with that with really advanced pro's it takes a very advanced player to be able to quickly sort out what they have to offer.

    When I am interacting with a really advanced player, I generally look for concepts, and, lacking a better word salad, their philosophy of improvising. Some of my sax coaching sessions, admittedly one on one, have been almost all discussion with very little playing other than short demo's.
    AndrewLawrenceBuco
    The Magic really starts to happen when you can play it with your eyes closed
  • edited January 2018 Posts: 2,419
    Jazzaferri wrote: »
    When I am interacting with a really advanced player, I generally look for concepts, and, lacking a better word salad, their philosophy of improvising.

    Similar to this, when I go to a class I'm looking for an overall idea to take home. That way I don't have to take notes, record video/audio...that stuff is great but it takes your attention from the matters at hand. And if that person is out there, who took a ton of notes, recorded stuff and then went home and woodshed on it until it was all absorbed, I bow down to you.
    But I can remember for the most classes I've been in, what I took home.
    Let's see...

    Wrembel: when you run out of ideas in the middle of the gig or even a song, go back to basics, play as simple as you possibly can until you catch a second wind.

    Giniaux: subdivide fast tempo songs and count them half as fast inside yourself, don't forget to move while playing, you need to make space within yourself.

    Hooijdonk: I can't teach you this stuff!
    It's about sitting down and playing, a lot.

    Soref: He lifted a fog back in a day about how to go through the song creating solo lines on the spot.

    Holovaty: I don't want to see you in my class!
    (OK, OK, that's because I've taken group lessons with him in Chicago a bunch of times...or maybe?!)

    Bergara: what are we supposed to do here?
    OK my real takeaway from him was that my room's window was a straight shot across from his, and I would hear the guy practicing his signature arps most mornings starting at 7am.

    Stephan: come up with your own licks, go home and woodshed them until you can use them in songs.

    Chang: if you're in the band make sure your intros and endings are tight, you can fake the middle.

    And so on...

    Several times, one thing became clear over and over, these guys are all masters of inversions. Which is one the reasons they're masters of the fretboard.
    Wim Glennrichter4208AndrewLawrence
    Every note wants to go somewhere-Kurt Rosenwinkel
  • JosechikyJosechiky
    edited January 2018 Posts: 107
    Hi Folks:
    This is just to let you know the Staff and Artists page of Django in June has been (mostly) updated for 2018. This year's guest artists include:
    • Angelo Debarre and his son Raangy (who will be our rhythm specialist)
    • the Mathias Lévy Trio -- which includes Sébastien Giniaux and Jean-Philippe Viret -- and their Revisiting Grappelli program
    • Tcha Limberger and Renaud Dardenne of Les Violons de Bruxelles
    • Fiona Monbet...on violin, of course
    • Christiaan van Hemert, who will offer a day of workshops for guitarists on the TUESDAY before Django Camp gets going, then work with violinists for the rest of the week
    • pretty sure Gonzalo Bergara will be back this year...stay tuned
    • Sonny Barbato and Alicia Baker dividing up accordion duties
    • Lisa Liu and Sara Labriola joining our teaching staff for the first time
    • Don Stiernberg back on mandolin
    • Giacomo Smith back on clarinet

    All them...and a bunch of other familiar faces. You'll find everyone here:
    http://djangoinjune.com/artists/

    Early Bird registration is open through February. Come join the fun!

    ~Andrew
    Django in June

    Andrew, for those who are far away from the place where DIJ will be held,would it be possible access to the recorded lessons of Gonzalo,Angelo,Sebastien,Christian and Tcha?
  • AndrewLawrenceAndrewLawrence Northampton, MA✭✭
    Posts: 44
    Josechiky wrote: »
    Andrew, for those who are far away from the place where DIJ will be held,would it be possible access to the recorded lessons of Gonzalo,Angelo,Sebastien,Christian and Tcha?

    Hi Josechiky: Sorry, but only if you make arrangements with someone in attendance who is recording the lessons...we don't record them ourselves. Lots of folks -- Denis Chang's DC Music School, Christiaan's Rosenberg Academy, Adrian's Soundslice, etc -- now offer good video lessons, though, if that's what you're looking for.

    DiJ is really about what we can get from personal interaction, from being here. The main reason I decided, back in the day, to make it a longer event was so it would be worth a traveling to...and most of our attendees come from well outside our region. If that's not completely out of the question for you, consider making the trip and let me know if there's any way we can make the event more accessible for you.

    Best,
    ~Andrew

  • NylonDaveNylonDave Glasgow✭✭✭ Perez Valbuena Flamenca 1991
    edited January 2018 Posts: 444
    dennis wrote: »
    Not quite sure what that meant but the whole mainstram commercial pedagogical culture is highly politicized and flawed

    Hi Dennis, it seems like you DO know what I meant, and quite precisely. I certainly wasn't trying to have a dig at you I hope it is clear that not only do I respect your teaching but I am also grateful for its effect on my own understanding of improvisation !

    It's funny though, the coincidence. You asked the question

    'Now the question is: is it possible to learn how to learn fast? I definitely think it is, it can be taught!'

    And I thought well yes, earnest and accomplished teachers have been diligently supporting hard working prodigies for ever, whether it be in Gypsy Jazz at home, or classical teachers or anything else.

    And then youtube suggested this video and the boys are funny and here is an example of a girl who sure learned to play fast. It seems like the Self Esteem movement which has (CYNICALLY) insisted that good tuition is non confrontational and flattering has deprived people of the quality feedback which would empower them to maximise their practice time.

    It's just the nature of training, you need to set the bar higher at every turn otherwise no improvement. Having people crawl under makes money. But that needn't be a problem for group events which are really social and inspirational.

    I hope everyone has a great time, it seems like everyone is trying their best.

    Also these boys are a hoot !



    D.
  • richter4208richter4208 ✭✭✭
    edited January 2018 Posts: 330
    Hey Andrew, does William Brunard usually teach bass or guitar at the camp? So Gonzalo is still a maybe?
    Seems like such a cool camp.....I want to make it
  • AndrewLawrenceAndrewLawrence Northampton, MA✭✭
    Posts: 44
    Hey Andrew, does William Brunard usually teach bass or guitar at the camp? So Gonzalo is still a maybe?
    Seems like such a cool camp.....I want to make it

    Hi Richter:

    William has done both. This year he'll be teaching primarily guitar. We'll have two bass instructors...one of whom is Jean Philippe Viret, who played with Grappelli for 8 years, and who now (among other projects) plays with the Mathias Levy Trio. We'll bring on another bass teacher as well so no teacher has to work with players at vastly different levels.

    I spoke to Gonzalo today and he's now firmly on board.

    And yes, I think it's a pretty cool camp. But then, I'm slightly biased. :)

    Hope you can join us!
    ~Andrew


    richter4208
  • JosechikyJosechiky
    Posts: 107
    Josechiky wrote: »
    Andrew, for those who are far away from the place where DIJ will be held,would it be possible access to the recorded lessons of Gonzalo,Angelo,Sebastien,Christian and Tcha?

    Hi Josechiky: Sorry, but only if you make arrangements with someone in attendance who is recording the lessons...we don't record them ourselves. Lots of folks -- Denis Chang's DC Music School, Christiaan's Rosenberg Academy, Adrian's Soundslice, etc -- now offer good video lessons, though, if that's what you're looking for.

    DiJ is really about what we can get from personal interaction, from being here. The main reason I decided, back in the day, to make it a longer event was so it would be worth a traveling to...and most of our attendees come from well outside our region. If that's not completely out of the question for you, consider making the trip and let me know if there's any way we can make the event more accessible for you.

    Best,
    ~Andrew
    Andrew,thanks for replying! I'd like to join DiJ and live the experience by myself,learning from the best (although I like Angelo,Tcha,Sebastien and Christiwanan so much,Gonzalo is one of my favourite guitar players I had the pleasure to see playing in Spain with his blues trio 3 months ago) but I'm afraid that's won't be possible,at least this year.I'll do it my best, to stay there in future editions.

    Anyway,if someone out there had the chance of recording some excerpts of the sessions and sharing with all of us,it will be really appreciated,for sure!

    I do have already checked and purchased most of the video lesson sites you mention,they are my only source of learning the gypsy jazz way :-).
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