DjangoBooks.com

Welcome to our Community!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Who's Online (0)

Related Discussions

Today's Birthdays

JoyceZ21is Julien Jenze

Bireli Paganini lick

marcieromarciero Southern MaineNew
edited November 2008 in Licks and Patterns Posts: 120
Not sure it's Paganini, but it;s some classically inflected lick I've heard Bireli do, a harmonized ascending line, mostly in fourths and fifths I think, so would be double stops on a violin (the fifths at any rate) which is why I say Paganini. One instance is at at 4:22 on There Will Never Be Another You from Vienna. The beginning is not that clear though. Dennis or someone else had to have trancribed this, no? This could save me some time and would be much appreciated.

Mike
«1

Comments

  • dennisdennis Montreal, QuebecModerator
    Posts: 2,131
    it's a technique paganini used often but it's a device called "horn fifths" (an imitation of horn calls)

    bireli plays it in E

    here it is in ascending order , bottom note first and top note second when a double stop is involved (watch the there will never be vid to get the fingering)

    open low E
    B
    E
    F#
    E + G#
    B
    G# + E
    B + F#
    E + G#

    it's good to practice this phrase with a metronome on 8th notes

    bireli uses it often over a Bb7 chord of Fm7 Bb7. Such is the case in there will never be another you

    he learned this technique when he was doing his PhD thesis on the "music of Palestrina and its effect on german romanticism" at oxford
  • marcieromarciero Southern MaineNew
    Posts: 120
    Thanks Dennis. You rock.

    Your Montreal in March show with Stochelo is def possibility, as I have vacation the week following.

    Mike
  • aa New York City✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 800
    dennis,

    are you kidding about bireli + oxford +palestrina ?
    Www.alexsimonmusic.com
    Learn how to play Gypsy guitar:
    http://alexsimonmusic.com/learn-gypsy-jazz-guitar/
  • marcieromarciero Southern MaineNew
    Posts: 120
    Dennis is pulling our leg here. He may be God, but pretty sure Bireli has only very limited formal schooling.

    Mike
  • V-dubV-dub San Francisco, CA✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 300
    Thanks Dennis, I've been wondering about that lick for a while.

    What's the prefered fingering for that, though:
    [code]
    ---------------------------
    ------------------5--7--9--
    ------------1--4--------9--
    ------2--4--2-----6--9-----
    ---2-----------------------
    0-------------------------- (A)[/code]

    or

    [code]------------------0--2--4--
    ------------------------5--
    ------------1--4--1--4-----
    ------2--4--2--------------
    ---2-----------------------
    0-------------------------- (B)[/code]?

    I'll have to check the archives at Oxford for that thesis. I'm currently pursuing my graduate degree in Quantum Physics and 17th century Basket-Making there.
  • dennisdennis Montreal, QuebecModerator
    Posts: 2,131
    the lick is always done on adjacent strings when doublestops are involved...

    [code]
    --------------------------
    ---------------------------
    ------------------9-11--13--
    ------2--4--6-9-6-9---14--------
    ---2--------7---------------
    0--------------------------
    [/code]

    wow this thread is starting to look like a star trek convention Q+A ...

    "In Episode 2E03, Captain Kirk was clearly seen using his photon X3 gun yet later blablablalba"
  • aa New York City✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 800
    dennis, how do you know so much about startrek convention Q&As ? ? ?

    :lol: :?:
    Www.alexsimonmusic.com
    Learn how to play Gypsy guitar:
    http://alexsimonmusic.com/learn-gypsy-jazz-guitar/
  • V-dubV-dub San Francisco, CA✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 300
    Clearly Dennis doesn't understand how to work with fixed-width fonts*. Here is a readable version:

    [code]-----------------------------
    -----------------------------
    ------------------9--11--13--
    ------2--4--6--9--6--9---14--
    ---2--------7----------------
    0---------------------------- [/code]

    *[i]A proportional typeface contains glyphs of varying widths, while a monospaced (non-proportional or fixed-width) typeface uses a single standard width for all glyphs in the font.

    Most people generally find proportional typefaces nicer-looking and easier to read, and thus they appear more commonly in professionally published printed material. For the same reason, GUI computer applications (such as word processors and web browsers) typically use proportional fonts. However, many proportional fonts contain fixed-width (tabular) figures so that columns of numbers stay aligned.

    Monospaced typefaces function better for some purposes because their glyphs line up in neat, regular columns. Most manually-operated typewriters and text-only computer displays use monospaced fonts. Most computer programs which have a text-based interface (terminal emulators, for example) use only monospace fonts in their configuration. Most computer programmers prefer to use monospace fonts while editing source code.

    ASCII art usually requires a monospaced font for proper viewing. In a web page, the or
     
    HTML tag most commonly specifies monospaced fonts. In LaTeX, the verbatim environment or the teletype font family (e.g., \texttt{...} or {\ttfamily ...}) uses monospaced fonts (in TeX, use {\tt ...}).

    Any two lines of text with the same number of characters in each line in a monospaced typeface should display as equal in width, while the same two lines in a proportional typeface may have radically different widths. This occurs because in a proportional font, glyph widths vary, such that wider glyphs (typically those for characters such as W, Q, Z, M, D, O, H, and U) use more space, and narrower glyphs (such as those for the characters i, t, l, and 1) use less space than the average.

    In the publishing industry, it was once the case that editors read manuscripts in monospaced fonts (typically Courier) for ease of editing and word count estimates, and it was considered discourteous to submit a manuscript in a proportional font. This has become less universal in recent years, such that authors need to check with editors as to their preference, though monospaced fonts are still the norm.[/i]
  • dennisdennis Montreal, QuebecModerator
    Posts: 2,131
    i do know about fixed fonts, i just wrote it out really really fast thinking that everything was properly aligned.

    doesn't this kinda look like a smaller and chubbier version of Teddy G?

    spock_003.jpg
  • BonesBones Moderator
    Posts: 3,129
    Can anyone post a sound clip of it?

    Thanks
Sign In or Register to comment.
Home  |  Forum  |  Blog  |  Contact  |  206-528-9873
The Premier Gypsy Jazz Marketplace
DjangoBooks.com
USD CAD GBP EUR AUD
USD CAD GBP EUR AUD
Banner Adverts
Sell Your Guitar
© 2021 DjangoBooks.com, all rights reserved worldwide.
Software: Kryptronic eCommerce, Copyright 1999-2021 Kryptronic, Inc. Exec Time: 0.046657 Seconds Memory Usage: 3.45079 Megabytes
Kryptronic