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Colin Cosimini's Gypsy Chord Book

MichaelHorowitzMichaelHorowitz SeattleAdministrator
edited March 2005 in Welcome Posts: 5,896
Hi All,

All three volumes of Colin Cosimini's Gypsy Chord Book are in Stock:

http://www.djangobooks.com/archives/200 ... stock.html

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Comments

  • JackJack western Massachusetts✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 1,911
    Hi, all.

    For what it's worth, these books were the breakthrough for me. I know more than a few folks have trouble with some of Colin's subs and harmonic 'liberties', but with just a little music theory under your belt, it's fairly easy to reverse engineer what he's doing so you end up with a basic progression. I think it's worth mentioning because in the long run I got so much more out of these than other chord books/playalongs, but people seem put off by the complexity of some of his charts. Don't be! Dive in, do the homework, and play it as you hear it.

    Best,
    Jack.
  • JAMFJAMF ChicagoNew
    Posts: 32
    Hi Jack,

    Can you or somebody elaborate a little more? How complex or advanced are these progressions/substitutions?

    I can't find a sample or more information on these books, but the description is interesting.

    I would say my skill level and knowledge of theory is approaching intermediate.

    Thanks.
  • JackJack western Massachusetts✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 1,911
    Hi,

    Although it doesn't really apply to my above post, you can find a sample page here to at least see his format:
    http://www.cosimini.co.uk/page12.html

    On many tunes, Colin offers a couple of sets of changes, one being far more harmonically complex (not necessarily better, but usually busier). I'm at work right now, but later I'll take a look and find an example to discuss. If you like the detective-story side to theory, I'd say pick up a volume. The skill level remains pretty constant from volume to volume, so have a look at the songlists and go from there.

    More to come,
    Jack.
  • JAMFJAMF ChicagoNew
    Posts: 32
    Thanks, that sample page helps a lot.
  • JackJack western Massachusetts✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 1,911
    Glad it helped. I'll still post an example of Colin's basic/extended changes, but I've just got back from a gig and I'm dog-tired. We're expecting a blizzard here tomorrow, though, so I should have time then.

    Best,
    Jack.
  • JAMFJAMF ChicagoNew
    Posts: 32
    Hopefully, you've dug yourself out of that blizzard by now. We got more than a light dusting here in Chicago as well.

    I've got Vol. 1 of this book on the way. Thanks for your help in making the decision.
  • JackJack western Massachusetts✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 1,911
    JAMF wrote:
    Hopefully, you've dug yourself out of that blizzard by now. We got more than a light dusting here in Chicago as well.

    I've got Vol. 1 of this book on the way. Thanks for your help in making the decision.

    No problem; I can't imagine you'll regret it. Once it arrives, check out Them There Eyes, Dark Eyes, Blues en Mineur, Limehouse, and Minor Swing for some examples of what I was writing about. Obviously, you won't always want to use the variants, but they can add something, especially in a duo setting. Meanwhile, the snow remains waist deep-they're actually trucking it away beneath my window right now. And while you probably already know this: if you're in Chicago, go check out Swing Gitan!

    Best,
    Jack.
  • JAMFJAMF ChicagoNew
    Posts: 32
    :shock: I've never heard of Swing Gitan. That'll change today. :lol:
  • JAMFJAMF ChicagoNew
    Posts: 32
    You were right. I'm not regretting getting this book. Firstly, it's fun to peruse the pics and read the captions. A lot of care went into creating this book. Secondly, I just worked my way through the "Nature Boy" progression and love it. The accompanying CD helps a lot, especially for those songs I"m not real familiar with.

    So thanks once again for chiming in and recommending this one.
  • JackJack western Massachusetts✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 1,911
    Glad it's turning out well. I also forgot to mention that Alphonso (from Swing Gitan) is a well known, well respected teacher of the Django style. I think he teaches at...the Old Town School of Folk? Is that what it's called? At any rate, it's in Chicago. Have a look!

    Best,
    Jack.
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