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Gypsy Jazz Chord Book?

KlezmorimKlezmorim South Carolina, USANew
edited August 2008 in Gypsy Jazz 101 Posts: 160
Is there a book that is a compendium of chord patterns most typically used by GJ players?

I know how to create chords from a scale (I-III-V, I-IIIb-V, etc.), but there are so many ways of voicing a chord and I'm looking for those patterns most likely to be used by Tchavolo, Bireli, et al. I'm looking for a PRINT reference, as opposed to a web site with a java-script chord generator.

Thanks in advance!
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Comments

  • JackJack western Massachusetts✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 1,911
    The Cosimini and Gypsy Rhythm books have some commonly used forms shown. A cheaper way to do it would be to simply print out and collate pages from a gypsy jazz specific web site (not a generator) like this:
    http://nuagesdeswing.free.fr/accords/accords_index.html

    best,
    Jack.
  • MichaelHorowitzMichaelHorowitz SeattleAdministrator
    Posts: 5,850
    What you're looking for is right here:













    Covers all the common chord progression in great detail with exact voicings transcribed from Django, Tchavolo, Bireli, Stochelo, etc.

    Also includes the most extensive Gypsy jazz chord library avaible.

    'm
  • Posts: 193
    BUMP !!!!!! :D

    On the Nuages the Swing site the chords dont have names, whats the problem.
  • KlezmorimKlezmorim South Carolina, USANew
    Posts: 160
    ...On the Nuages the Swing site the chords dont have names, whats the problem.

    Are you referring to one of the chord diagrams like this from the list of "Accords demi-diminués (Ø)"?:

    demi_diminue_a.gif

    Here's the key: The numbers in the circles refer to which finger to use on a particular fret. The orange circle indicates the root note of that chord shape. The orange numbers/letters along the top indicate which part of the chord each note represents, ie. flatted-5th (5b), minor-third (3m), etc. An "X" means "Don't play this string for this chord."

    These chords are "movable;" just slide them up or down, as needed. In the above example, if the top line represents the nut, or "Zero fret," we observe that we don't play either E-string (see the "X"s?), and the orange root note is on the A-string, up two frets, namely, B. So... this chord is a "B-half-diminished," or more correctly, "B minor-seventh, flat fifth." Slide this shape up a fret and it becomes C minor-seventh, flat five. Another two frets up and we get the D-half-diminished chord, and so on.

    Got it? Now go practice! 8)
  • Posts: 193
    Klezmorim wrote:
    ...On the Nuages the Swing site the chords dont have names, whats the problem.

    Are you referring to one of the chord diagrams like this from the list of "Accords demi-diminués (Ø)"?:

    demi_diminue_a.gif

    Here's the key: The numbers in the circles refer to which finger to use on a particular fret. The orange circle indicates the root note of that chord shape. The orange numbers/letters along the top indicate which part of the chord each note represents, ie. flatted-5th (5b), minor-third (3m), etc. An "X" means "Don't play this string for this chord."

    These chords are "movable;" just slide them up or down, as needed. In the above example, if the top line represents the nut, or "Zero fret," we observe that we don't play either E-string (see the "X"s?), and the orange root note is on the A-string, up two frets, namely, B. So... this chord is a "B-half-diminished," or more correctly, "B minor-seventh, flat fifth." Slide this shape up a fret and it becomes C minor-seventh, flat five. Another two frets up and we get the D-half-diminished chord, and so on.

    Got it? Now go practice! 8)

    I got the first part, but I get confused at this part

    "So... this chord is a "B-half-diminished," or more correctly, "B minor-seventh, flat fifth." Slide this shape up a fret and it becomes C minor-seventh, flat five. Another two frets up and we get the D-half-diminished chord, and so on."

    Why is a chord called so, I read a few sites about it and still dont know why a chord is called so.:? I amazed that u can say "that is a B-half-diminished" , I wish I could do that to :shock: :D . lol
    I think knowing the names of the chords is a really important part. Could u give me a good page that explains it simply. I really want to learn it. :D
  • KlezmorimKlezmorim South Carolina, USANew
    Posts: 160
    Here are a couple pages that should be of some help to you. As you review this material, have your guitar on your knee so you can try out the chords and get used to their sound as well as their fingering.

    http://www.jazzguitar.be/jazz_guitar_chord_theory.html
    http://jmdl.com/howard/music/quick_crd_ref.html


    Learning just a few basics of music theory will be of enormous help to anyone learning an instrument. Even those folks who claim they don't know (or don't want to know) theory know more than they realize. If I play a chord progression of C-F#-G, unless you are tone-deaf, you will say "Hey, that doesn't sound right!" If I play C-F-G, you'll know that these chords "fit" together. At its most basic, music theory is a way of explaining *why* some notes/chords "fit" and others don't.
  • Posts: 193
    THANKS !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :D Your really helped me. :D
  • KlezmorimKlezmorim South Carolina, USANew
    Posts: 160
    THANKS !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :D Your really helped me. :D

    Glad to help...

    I love it when a forum comes together!

    8)
  • Posts: 597
    Klezmorim wrote:
    demi_diminue_a.gif

    I love love love that grip. So many different things going on with it.

    Root on 5th string ... Bm7b5 (aka half-dimished)
    Root on 2nd string ... Dm6
    Implied root on 6th string, 3rd fret ... G9

    And if you move that grip a string set so that you have xx2323, then you've got Edim7, Gdim7, Bbdim7, Dbdim. And C7b9, Eb7b9, Gb7b9, A7b9 (all the roots are implied). Don't even have to move it, all those chord names are in one position.

    Now, if you move that grip again to 2323xx, then you'll have Gb7b5. Fun stuff.

    8)
  • KlezmorimKlezmorim South Carolina, USANew
    Posts: 160
    ... And if you move that grip up a fret, you get another four Dim7 chords.

    But wait, there's more! Move it up yet one more fret and you get still another four chords.

    Yes, friends, that's 3x4, or 12 chords -a whole chromatic scale!!- all from one fabulous grip!!!

    Hurry! If you act now, we'll throw in -absolutely free!- this handy little fingering for making Minor chords:

    accord_mineur_c.gif

    It has not ONE but TWO!! root notes per chord!

    So whaddya waitin' for? Practice now! and make these fine chords a part of YOUR jammin' guitar chord collection!


    (Are we having too much fun or what?) :lol: :lol: :lol:

    ((Sincere apologies to our non-U.S. readers, most of whom won't get the "joke"))
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