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Angelo "Week-End Guitar" Funky Gypsy Jazz from Cor

Ted GottsegenTed Gottsegen Rowayton, CTModerator
edited May 2005 in History
Hi All,

I've long had a fascination with the South of France and Corsica. Both Tchan-Tchou and Bousquet were from the south and each has a unique style characterised by a rigid, almost locked right hand and an extensive use downstrokes. Moreno (my favorite all around contemporary player) received a good deal of tutoring from Tchan-Tchou, and in all actually both Tchan-Tchou and Bousquet figure largely into his sound, more than any other contemporary guitarist. Corsica has given us some great guitarists - Jean-Jacques Gristi and Rodolphe Raffalli among todays generation. But the question has always been - "Who were the other guitar players in this region during this time? There had to be more than two or three."

So, I've been on the search for other players in that style and came across an album by someone named Angelo. The record was listed as being "Corsican Guitar Music" so I will assume that he is of Corsican extraction. I was originally told the record wasn't that good, but I actually love it.

The full title is "Week-End Guitar - Angelo et ses Guitares et Mandolines". Sure enough, the same rigid technique is there and he is playing both acoustic and electric guitar. Sonically the album is wild! Angelo begins with an intense "Caravan" complete with funky Arabic overtones in the vocals, to a 1950's - 60's American instrumental pop sound, to some fiery samba on "Tico Tico" (the rhythm guitar on this track is outstanding) to a ballady "Nuages" and a very Tchan-Tchou-esque "Les Yeux Noirs" to a very melancholy solo piece on sounds a lot like "Jeux Interdits".

When playing electric, his tone is sumptuous, very similar to Jimmy Bryant's and the acoustic tone from his DiMauro is great. The mandolins stick to the background and act like a string section would, while the electric slide guitar (yes, that's right, electric slide guitar) just seems to come in and fill-up space. A little out of place, but I don't mind, just adds to the uniqueness of the session.

Perhaps the most interesting aspect of this album are the different musical flavors contained on the record. Like Bousquet, Angelo takes the myriad of flavors permeating throughout the Mediterranean region and places them into what we consider a modern Gypsy Jazz sound. Swing, Samba - are certainly jazz and Django influenced. The arabic overtones could very well come from North Africa , the use of mandolins, solo guitar with classical overtones probably have their roots in traditional Corsican music. Add to this his switching between acoustic and electric guitars the palette is pretty diverse.

This is what I love about the old school - the use of anything and everything around them to make very cool music, the kitchy electric sound especially. As a player I'd call him a more adventurous Tchan-Tchou, but technically not as intense as Bousquet.

Seek this record out if you can, it's really an interesting and rewarding listen and another snapshot at a time and place which is still pretty mysterious and uncharted by todays standards.

Best,

Ted

Comments

  • JackJack western Massachusettsâś­âś­âś­âś­
    Seek this record out if you can, it's really an interesting and rewarding listen and another snapshot at a time and place which is still pretty mysterious and uncharted by todays standards.

    Ted...where the hell do you shop? Every time I turn around, it's like you've got another edition of the Dead Sea Scrolls. If this one's available somewhere not on a deserted mountaintop, please let us know.

    Thanks as always,
    Jack.
  • LOL!

    No doubt, Ted, I was so intrigued by your description that I tried to google it, and man, I got less than nothing.
  • AndoAndo South Bend, INModerator
    The Amestoy Trio from Toulouse plays in a sunny Southern style. It's guitar, accordion, and tuba. Google 'em. What do you think of them, Ted? I think they're great, but it's closer probably to Chaput's "Guitares a Danser" than Moreno and Tchan-Tchou's dazzling in all that hard sunlight.
  • Ted GottsegenTed Gottsegen Rowayton, CTModerator
    Ando wrote:
    The Amestoy Trio from Toulouse plays in a sunny Southern style. It's guitar, accordion, and tuba. Google 'em. What do you think of them, Ted? I think they're great, but it's closer probably to Chaput's "Guitares a Danser" than Moreno and Tchan-Tchou's dazzling in all that hard sunlight.

    I just checked them out, and don't think much of them. What they are playing is ok, I guess...but just not up my alley.
  • BarengeroBarengero Auda CityProdigy
    Hi Ted,
    can you tell us more about Angelo Petisi and the other corsian guys like Paulo Quilici, Jaques Istria, Les Guitares de l´Empire and so on? I have Paulo Quilicis Album "Les Guitares a Paulo" and I love it. Patrick Desaunay covered the title song "Les Guitares a Paulo" on his CD "Couleurs Manouche (Buda Musique KMCD 25, 1994).

    Best regards
    Barengero
  • Ted GottsegenTed Gottsegen Rowayton, CTModerator
    Hi Barengero,

    First let me say "thanks!" for posting so much.
    Barengero wrote:
    Hi Ted,
    can you tell us more about Angelo Petisi and the other corsian guys like Paulo Quilici, Jaques Istria, Les Guitares de l´Empire and so on? I have Paulo Quilicis Album "Les Guitares a Paulo" and I love it. Patrick Desaunay covered the title song "Les Guitares a Paulo" on his CD "Couleurs Manouche (Buda Musique KMCD 25, 1994).

    Thank you for this list. Now I have some other guitarists to look for. This scene is an entire mystery to me, and it's my project for the next few months. I'll try and obtain some examples of all of the instrumentalists you've mentioned above.

    Incidently, I might have found another recording by Angelo, I'm waiting for a confirmation that it is what I'm hoping it is. Standby!

    Best Regards,

    Ted
  • BarengeroBarengero Auda CityProdigy
    O.k. Ted, feel free to blow me away on ebay concerning Quilici and Istria as you did with the Angelo-Petisi-record :wink:
    But joking apart: I have no problem with that, cause I think the right man gets those rare records. You should add "Les Trois Consuls" to the list. Look out for the record "Guitarama" Consul XCMX 19680, it is a Sampler from the 60´s, containing recordings of Quilici, Les Guitares de´l Empire, Jacques Istria and Les Trois Consuls.It´s a good survey over the corsian scene. But it´s not all jazz, some recordings are quite folkloristic.

    Best regards

    Barengaro
  • BarengeroBarengero Auda CityProdigy
    I often wondered who was the arranger of some of the tracks on Angelos LP "week-end guitar" called "A. Angels". He arranged the titles "Return", "Les Yeux noirs" and "Romance". The composer of teh really lovely tune "Piccina" is "Arc Angels". Angelo made some records with italian mandoline stuff and there are arrangements of "Angels", too.

    So I was pretty curious when I came across a LP with the title: "Angels et sa guitare: Guitare Hawaienne" Les Tréteaux 6470 (I already knew that Angelo made a LP with a similar subtitle "Angelo et ses guitares Hawaiennes"). On this record of "Angels" there is a really weird version of "Nuages" played by a "Guitare Hawaienne" (=electric slide guitar). And there are some compositions of "Angels": "Flowers on the beach", "Hawaian Love". But unfortunately no informations about "Angels" himself. Can anyone give me a clue about "Angels" and his relationship to Angelo Petisi?

    Best regards

    Barengero
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