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Anyone try a Dearmond Pickup?

Has anyone ever tried using a vintage Dearmond pickup in their gypsy guitars? Archtop.com says that they need 7/8" of clearance when the highest fret is fretted. My Dell'Arte has that at the farthest end of the soundhole by the bridge. This seems to be a common place to put Stimers, so I would assume it would still sound good. It looks to me that the mounting rod that connects behind the tailpiece would work fine (or at least could be modified to work).

Is there anything else that I should be thinking about? These pickups can be had for a couple hundred bucks, and because of the adjustable polepieces might even sound more even than a Stimer. So, if they would work for gypsy guitars, I might buy one as an experiment.
g1.jpg

Also, there are soundhole models which are much cheaper and seem to be similar in make up. Any ideas if these would fit the smaller soundhole of the petite bouche?

c250_1.JPG
Work on the <A HREF="http://www.petersonmusic.com/wiki">Gypsy Jazz Fake Book</A>.No finale experience necessary.

Comments

  • StringswingerStringswinger Santa Cruz and San Francisco, CA✭✭✭✭ 1993 Dupont MD-20
    Posts: 391
    If you can get an adjustable pole piece DeArmond (1100) for a couple hundred bucks, go for it. I see them bring 600-1000 on E-bay. I use a model 1000 with my D hole. It sounds like a Stimer (or should i say a Stimer sounds like a Dearmond?) They will fit very few oval holes (Favinos with high bridges seem like the only good match for this pickup).

    The soundhole Dearmond will not fit an oval hole SELMAC.

    Cheers,

    Marc

    www.hotclubpacific.com
  • badjazzbadjazz Maui, Hawaii USA✭✭✭ Rodrigo Shopis, YL Cholet
    Posts: 127
    I use a dearmond FHC, and it would not fit any round hole GJ guitar that i've ever played without extensive messing around, and I doubt even then with most guitars. I'd recommend going with a stimer for a GJ guitar because they are already set up to be used that way, sound very similar, and it is usually cheaper to get a new stimer than a vintage dearmond that works. And, as the other post said, the sound hole dearmond will not fit a GJ guitar.
  • CampusfiveCampusfive Los Angeles, CA✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 98
    badjazz wrote:
    ... a vintage dearmond that works...

    Exactly!

    I've put one of my FHC's on my LeVoi, but I couldn't tell if it sounded good. It did fit, though. I used the mouting bracket.
  • Chris PetersonChris Peterson Santa Monica, CANew
    Posts: 50
    I use a model 1000 with my D hole. It sounds like a Stimer (or should i say a Stimer sounds like a Dearmond?) They will fit very few oval holes (Favinos with high bridges seem like the only good match for this pickup).

    Well, I am lucky enough that I have a Favino style guitar, so the high bridge might work. Do you have a picture of your D-Hole with the 1000? It would be great to see how it all fits in.

    As for finding a good one, that can be kind of a crap shoot with any vintage gear on ebay. I am still pretty interested in trying one out, as it would be great to buy the one pickup and be able to transfer it to my archtop when necessary.
    Work on the <A HREF="http://www.petersonmusic.com/wiki">Gypsy Jazz Fake Book</A>.No finale experience necessary.
  • Bob HoloBob Holo Moderator
    Posts: 1,243
    A local guy (Portland, OR) is selling on on Ebay. He's decided to go acoustic w/ his Epi Blackstone.

    _______________________________________________

    Subject: Dearmond for sale...

    In case you might know someone looking, I am selling one...

    http://cgi.ebay.com/Dearmond-Pickup-for ... Mike_W0QQi
    temZ200105136704QQihZ010QQcategoryZ22670QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

    -M

    _______________________________________
    You get one chance to enjoy this day, but if you're doing it right, that's enough.
  • Colin PerryColin Perry Montreal, QCNew
    Posts: 115
    In terms of getting it to fit, there is no rule that states that you must place the pickup as close to the fingerboard as possible. A lot of early western swing players placed theirs close to the bridge. It's all a question of what sounds best to you. And yes, if you can get a model 1100 for a couple hundred dollars, then do it immediately, if for no other reason than resell it. The last one I had sold on ebay for $1800.
  • badjazzbadjazz Maui, Hawaii USA✭✭✭ Rodrigo Shopis, YL Cholet
    Posts: 127
    just thought I should caution people who think that swapping a dearmond between guitars is always as simple as it sounds. It usually takes a bit of tweaking to get the setup just right on any one guitar, and when you swap them you are starting over. Mostly it isn't anything too serious, but if you have to adjust the angle of the bracket by bending the support rod with a pair of pliers and reposition or add/subtract felt, it does take a little messing around. Also, every time you take one of those on or off a guitar there is a chance for dings and scratches. Not to mention that most of them, even the ones with adjustable pole pieces, work better with nickel/steel strings. Further, most people like their action somewhat lower when playing electric (why have high action to help your acoustic volume when you are using an amp). So, as someone who uses Dearmonds pretty much exclusively when playing electric, I just wanted to point out that the switching, while still easier than just about any other solution, still has its issues.
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