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Gitane D-500 hex wrench size? DG-300, too..

Hey, I've just unearthed my neglected grande bouche after an extended stint in its case, and there's waay too much relief in the neck now.

I've slacked off all the strings, but I'll need to give the truss rod a good tweak before bringing 'er back up to pitch..

Can I assume that a standard clockwise twist's in order?

And can someone please tell me what size hex wrench (or Allen key, as they're referred to up here in Canada) I'll need.

Guess I'll need a pretty long one, too.. Any suggested suppliers?

While I'm asking, what about the petite bouche Gitanes? I've got two of 'em (maple 250 & the Jorgenson) and I'll need to adjust their necks sooner or later. How in the heck am I going to be able to get at the truss rod!?!

Josh, do you or Michael have something in the shop that I could order?

BTW, been up to my old tricks, playin the bars (electric blues w/a Flying V) for the long, hot summer..

Good to be back!!

thanks guys,
david
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Comments

  • ElliotElliot Madison, WisconsinNew
    edited September 2006 Posts: 551
    I've excised my post. Please see David's instructions below.
  • drollingdrolling New
    Posts: 153
    Elliot wrote:
    Wanna bust your guitar? Then do it yourself!

    But just in case you're foolish enough to try, here's a hint from an experienced luthier friend of mine - don't rely on the rod to do the work. Push the neck towards the place where it is supposed to go, then adjust the truss rod accordingly. A very small twist is all you're going to do...but don't do it, it is No 1 on the list of how to screw up your guitar with the least effort.

    Listen to me!!!
    Elliot, you're kidding, right?

    This ain't rocket surgery we're talking here.. I've perfomed truss rod adjustments on dozens of guitars over many years as a player and have never, ever encountered a single problem.

    There are certain tasks I'll entrust only to the skilled hands of a luthier, but tweaking a trussrod's as elementary as changing strings and something that every player should be able to do themselves.

    Maybe you could ask your luthier friend what size hex wrench he'd recommend for the job?
  • ElliotElliot Madison, WisconsinNew
    edited September 2006 Posts: 551
    If you already know how to do it yourself, that's another story (as you can see from my amended post). I would ask him for you, but the last time I was over there at his shop his dog bit me, no kidding; I'm sure Josh can help you out in any case.
  • JackJack western Massachusetts✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 1,911
    Hi David,

    It's been a long time, but I remember having to adjust the truss on my old D-500 once, and I ended up using a regular Allen key, but reversed it so I was applying pressure to the short end. Not ideal, but it worked...I was sure to be really gentle. I just went through the set till I found the fit.

    Best,
    Jack.
  • drollingdrolling New
    Posts: 153
    While we're on this subject, I'd like to recommend that anyone reading this thread NOT ATTEMPT bending the neck of their guitar in the manner you've described in your ammended post.

    Placing that kind of pressure on a neck that's glued onto a lightly braced archtop, such as the selmacs we're discussing is just asking for trouble, IMO.

    Even the most robust, overbuilt plywood dreadnaught should be securely braced in a jig before applying any kind of force to the neck, altho' the method you're suggesting does work exceptionally well on solid body electrics w/bolt-on necks.

    I prefer to remove the neck completely, place it across two saw-horses and stand on it. In the absense of saw-horses, two matching kitchen chairs will do. If the neck remains bowed after I've stood on it for 10 or 15 minutes, I get my ex-wife to come over & set on it for a spell. Works every time!
  • drollingdrolling New
    Posts: 153
    Jack wrote:
    Hi David,

    It's been a long time, but I remember having to adjust the truss on my old D-500 once, and I ended up using a regular Allen key, but reversed it so I was applying pressure to the short end. Not ideal, but it worked...I was sure to be really gentle. I just went through the set till I found the fit.

    Best,
    Jack.
    Hey thanks Jack! My post above, BTW, was in response to Elliot, in case that's less than obvious..
  • JackJack western Massachusetts✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 1,911
    drolling wrote:
    If the neck remains bowed after I've stood on it for 10 or 15 minutes, I get my ex-wife to come over & set on it for a spell. Works every time!

    David, you're an evil and funny man.
  • ElliotElliot Madison, WisconsinNew
    edited September 2006 Posts: 551
    Sorry, I guess he thought I was talking about electrics. Perhaps one day I might reach the level where I can stand on the neck of my guitar with confidence. On the other hand....lol.
  • Bob HoloBob Holo Moderator
    Posts: 1,243
    Take it easy... that neck will come back into shape fast.

    You may need only 1/8 to 1/4 of a turn to do the job.

    It's better to not adjust enough and then have to loosen the strings and do more... than to overtighten the truss rod.

    Worst case circumstance if you go too slow and are too careful is that you'll have to replace your strings because you'll have loosened/tightened them too many times and they'll get funky. Always make sure your strings are loosened when adjusting. Some of the new tweaky truss rods & neck angle adjusters on double M&T necks are OK to adjust under tension but most "good ol" truss rods are best done w/ completely loose strings.
    You get one chance to enjoy this day, but if you're doing it right, that's enough.
  • drollingdrolling New
    Posts: 153
    Thanks Bob - I did slacken the strings a few days ago in anticipation of the adjustment I'd be making..

    And I usually loosen the rod before tightening - and only in the tiniest increments, of course..

    BUT I WISH I knew what size hex wrench's required for the job.. I've never touched the neck on this guitar, but it's definitely acquired a bit too much relief over the hot, humid summer months..

    Now that Michael's selling these guitars someone here must be doing the setups..

    Josh?
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