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rk378 LLbm Hellopackers

Give up the extra two frets to the body?

How important are the extra 2 frets really (12fret vs. 14 fret to body). I played a Gitane D-hole that sounded and felt real good, but was 12 frets to the body. I was a bit bummed, but didn't think it was that big of a deal. How many of you play both rhythm and lead on a 12 fret? What songs did Django originally record with his d-hole anyway?
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  • CalebFSUCalebFSU Tallahassee, FLModerator Made in USA Dell Arte Hommage
    Posts: 557
    My first Gypsy guitar was a D-500, and I loved it. I never really had a problem, but maybe my technique just evolved around the guitar. I have a Dell arte now the is 14 and have yet to really go "Damn!!! I can play this or that now that I have 14 to the body"
    Hard work beats talent, when talent doesn't work hard.
  • MinorBluesMinorBlues New York✭✭✭
    Posts: 72
    How do you like the dell arte now in comparison to the d-500? And can anyone answer the question about django or is that unknown?
  • CalebFSUCalebFSU Tallahassee, FLModerator Made in USA Dell Arte Hommage
    Posts: 557
    I absolutley love my Dell Arte. It is the guitar I wanted ever since I started wanting wanting a Sel/Mac ( Actually I really wanted a DA Jimmy Rosenberg a few years ago when I got into this music) But to be honest for the price the D-500 was great. It was a hell of a workhorse.
    Hard work beats talent, when talent doesn't work hard.
  • fourowlsfourowls Brisbane, Queensland, AustraliaNew Petrarca Grande Bouche
    Posts: 72
    MinorBlues wrote: »
    How do you like the dell arte now in comparison to the d-500? And can anyone answer the question about django or is that unknown?
    I have a Dell'arte Pigalle...and it is fantastic. Good specs, proper DR saddle/tail piece, good tuners, solid constructions and a lovely slightly flat neck...I have had a D500 which I also liked (and was my first GJ guitar). I would definitely get one again, and it was comfortable to play. To be honest, from my point of view as I have owned 2 Dell'artes (the other was an Angelo Debarre signature) and 2 Gitanes..(a D500 and a D250..oval hole 14 frets) I think the Dell Artes are just a tiny bit better in finish and construction than the Gitanes. The Dell'artes just put a few more higher specs and features on theirs (e.g. a DR tailpiece whereas the Gitanes put a Saga tailpiece) and better tuners. However if I can pick up a well priced D500 I will and really although having the extra frets is cool, I probably won't miss it, or use the D500 more for rhythm or comping style of things...

  • ScoredogScoredog Santa Barbara, Ca✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 592
    personally as a lead player I much prefer 14 frets to the body.
  • 12 fret instruments or 14 frets without the cutaway do limit the high note choices.
    The Magic really starts to happen when you can play it with your eyes closed
  • Wim GlennWim Glenn oƃɐɔᴉɥƆModerator 503
    Posts: 1,017
    I started out on short scale D hole then changed to long scale D hole and now long scale oval hole. As a rhythm player, it's not important and I wouldn't miss it. But for lead playing, I could never go back.

    It's perhaps not as much about the number of frets as it is about the scale length - on short scale guitars the strings are too floppy. You need the higher tension of the longer scale guitar to get a powerful attack and sufficient bounceback from the strings to play fast stuff.
  • Short scales probably work better with the 11's or sometimes even 12's if they are heavily built.
    The Magic really starts to happen when you can play it with your eyes closed
  • ScoredogScoredog Santa Barbara, Ca✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 592
    Wim Glenn wrote: »
    I started out on short scale D hole then changed to long scale D hole and now long scale oval hole. As a rhythm player, it's not important and I wouldn't miss it. But for lead playing, I could never go back.

    It's perhaps not as much about the number of frets as it is about the scale length - on short scale guitars the strings are too floppy. You need the higher tension of the longer scale guitar to get a powerful attack and sufficient bounceback from the strings to play fast stuff.

    I believe one can play plenty fast with correct tension on a short scale. I recently asked a few lead players who most are familiar with this on this board about short scale guitars, as I was considering one and those players were all fine with them. If you play electric guitar too sometimes it is an easier transition...I see this conversation has turned from the original question but I believe that has been answered..
  • pdgpdg ✭✭
    Posts: 59
    Bireli plays "medium-scale" Hahl guitars -- 650 mm (as opposed to 12-fret 640 mm or long scale 670 mm).
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