Logo
Call Us
Categories

DjangoBooks.com

Welcome to our Community!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Today's Birthdays

LEstes mntnmike zippy

Who's Online (0)

New Favino Website - The Real Deal

12346

Comments

  • djadamdjadam Boulder, CONew
    edited April 2006
    scot wrote:
    If you think the "story" about guitarists going to Favino's workshop is just a story to jack up his reputation (and price) I don't know what to say about that, except to say that it isn't a "story". It's something that actually happened. You can't make a reputation on a "story".

    I never doubted the veracity of that story. I acknowledged that it was impressive and the word "story" wasn't meant to connote fiction.

    Also realize that I was the first person to acknowledge that I hadn't played many selmacs, so ease up on that part. That's called a disclaimer and it's the reason you should have taken my post more lightly as it was intended.

    I thought I explained all this in a subsequent post.
  • ben-dben-d ✭✭✭
    I'm wondering if anyone can speak as to the output of JP Favino in the mid to late 80's and through the 90's...

    Compared to the number of Jacques Favino's from the 70's that I have seen come and go online at different shops in the last few years, I seem to have seen relatively very few JP Favino's...correct me if I'm wrong on this ratio.

    Is there a reason for this? Did he make fewer petite / grande bouche jazz models after he took over the shop on his own...or is everyone with a JP just hanging on to theirs?
  • Ted GottsegenTed Gottsegen Rowayton, CTModerator
    Hi ben-d
    ben-d wrote:
    I'm wondering if anyone can speak as to the output of JP Favino in the mid to late 80's and through the 90's...

    Compared to the number of Jacques Favino's from the 70's that I have seen come and go online at different shops in the last few years, I seem to have seen relatively very few JP Favino's...correct me if I'm wrong on this ratio.

    Jacques mades (comparatively speaking) and ton of guitars in the 1970's. The results were mixed, some were outstanding, others not-so-much. Also, there are times when Jean-Pierre Favino guitars are passed off as as Jacques models, despite the signature on the label so you can't always go by what you see on the shops.
    ben-d wrote:
    Is there a reason for this? Did he make fewer petite / grande bouche jazz models after he took over the shop on his own...or is everyone with a JP just hanging on to theirs?

    Yes, Jean-Pierre got out of the Rue de Clignacourt shop and moved out to the south of France in the foothills of the Pyrennes mountains where he makes about 6 guitars a year, give or take. This is why you see so few on the used market because A) there aren't that many out there; and B) because he makes so few, he takes his time and really works them out so I'd be willing to bet most everyone one is a winner.

    Plus, as I've tried to point out that he makes his own guitars, not the same ones that his father made. Even the difference between a JP from '95 and '04 are pretty interesting! These guitars are instantly identifiable on CD if you know what you're looking for. I think one would be hard pressed to be able to tell what model any other guitarist is playing (pictures aside). This isn't an insult to those artisans who are striving to make a Selmer guitar; it's a testament to the individuality of the luthier. Simply put, they don't sound the same as trad Selmer style guitars, so a lot of people aren't that interested.

    Best,

    Ted
  • pallopennapallopenna Rhode IslandNew
    Plus, as I've tried to point out that he makes his own guitars, not the same ones that his father made. Even the difference between a JP from '95 and '04 are pretty interesting! These guitars are instantly identifiable on CD if you know what you're looking for.

    Ted,

    Can you point to some examples on CD?

    Thanks,

    -Paul
    Reject the null hypothesis.
  • langleydjangolangleydjango Langley, WA USA✭✭✭✭
    pallopenna wrote:
    Plus, as I've tried to point out that he makes his own guitars, not the same ones that his father made. Even the difference between a JP from '95 and '04 are pretty interesting! These guitars are instantly identifiable on CD if you know what you're looking for.

    Ted,

    Can you point to some examples on CD?

    Thanks,

    -Paul

    Hey, that'd be a good thread to start!

    Oh, wait...:wink:

    http://djangobooks.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1554
  • pallopennapallopenna Rhode IslandNew
    True, I've read that thread, but I was referring to Ted's specific distinction between the a JP form '95 and one from '04.

    -Paul
    Reject the null hypothesis.
  • Ted GottsegenTed Gottsegen Rowayton, CTModerator
    Hey Paul,
    pallopenna wrote:
    True, I've read that thread, but I was referring to Ted's specific distinction between the a JP form '95 and one from '04.

    -Paul

    The differences are in their construction, not in sound. Tonally they are very, very close. I discussed these elsewhere in this thread...can't remember where, though.

    Best,

    Ted
  • pallopennapallopenna Rhode IslandNew
    Ted,

    Got it.

    Thanks,

    -Paul
    Reject the null hypothesis.
  • ramsezazramsezaz Paris, FranceNew
    Sorry to revive an old thread, but I thought I might add this.

    I though "to be on a league of their own" was a bit exagerated.
    I was a bit skeptical though I really dig the Favino aura and legend...

    Until yesterday...

    I had the chance to try the Jacques Favino n°207 from 1972. Now I understand what you meant Ted.

    First of all the volume was really incredible. a softly touch and she would start to give voice.
    When I tried attacking a bit more (but still reasonably), it would really start to yell. I'd say the beast was 1,5time louder than my anastasio which is not really quiet.
    But projection is not everything.
    The tone was really great. I tried playing close to the bridge , farther, and in bothe case the sound changed but was deep. Both dark and well defined. Deep and Cristal clear.
    The sound was so well defined that for La Pompe, I had to put extra care to make all the strings ring. You could hear every single note of the chord.

    Now I don't know if it was because the guitar was great at the beging of because of the 34 years of harsh playing (the owner didnot realise it was a treasure, and was used to take this guitar to the beach, and to bring it everywhere with no case).
    Anyway the sound is unforgetable and as my first experience with a Favino, I'll never forget this day :roll:

    The hardest time was when I realised I was not bringing it back home ...
  • AndoAndo South Bend, INModerator
    Has anyone been to JP's workshop in Castelbiague?

    On the subject of $

    Let's say you're no Bireli Lagrene and want a $6500 JP Favino without touching savings.

    Take out a short-term loan for a year. Not including interest, you'll pay $541.66 per month for twelve months. In a lot of places, that's a lease on a decent apartment, or a significant car note. It's also like buying a new CD (at $17.80 per) every day for a year.

    To finance this with gigs, you need to play around eleven $50 gigs a month. That's two to three gigs per week, every week, for a year.

    Just sayin'.

    Ando
Sign In or Register to comment.
Kryptronic Internet Software Solutions