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New Favino Website - The Real Deal

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Comments

  • Josh HeggJosh Hegg Tacoma, WAModerator
    Posts: 622
    Yes it is on the site and is very light. The VR is about the same.
  • Bob HoloBob Holo Moderator
    Posts: 1,238
    "The Best" as applied to a line of acoustic guitars as a whole? I want some of what we're smoking here on this thread. Don't Bogart that joint, my friend...

    Enthusiasm aside, guitars are like fingerprints, no two are the same and not all are created equal - even ones made by the same builder of the same material on the same day.

    Way cool that Favino has a website now - thanks for the link.
    You get one chance to enjoy this day, but if you're doing it right, that's enough.
  • fraterfrater Prodigy
    Posts: 763
    Bob Holo wrote:
    "The Best" as applied to a line of acoustic guitars as a whole? I want some of what we're smoking here on this thread.

    You can't have it, sorry: not all joints are created equal - even ones made by the same dealer of the same grass on the same trip... :)
  • Bob HoloBob Holo Moderator
    Posts: 1,238
    frater wrote:
    Bob Holo wrote:
    "The Best" as applied to a line of acoustic guitars as a whole? I want some of what we're smoking here on this thread.

    You can't have it, sorry: not all joints are created equal - even ones made by the same dealer of the same grass on the same trip... :)

    ... wise words ...
    You get one chance to enjoy this day, but if you're doing it right, that's enough.
  • dennisdennis Montreal, QuebecModerator
    Posts: 2,020
    i think guitars should be tried before making any purchases... i've tried a few vieille reserves at samois... some were great, others not so... like they say: no two guitars are the same
  • scotscot Virtuoso
    Posts: 502
    A Favino guitar IS different from all the rest. All the best guitarists in Paris came to Jacques Favino's old workshop - the one in Clignancourt - to talk guitar and just hang out. And naturally he always wanted to know what he could do to make the guitars better. It is not unlike the D'Angelico/D'Aquisto guitar story - all the best jazz guitarists in NYC visited that shop. Their requirments and feedback allowed D'Angelico to continue the development of his guitars. Then D'Aquisto's restless creativity allowed even further refinement. Likewise with Jacques and Jean-Pierre Favino. Two generations, the first making terrific guitars, and the second building and improving on that legacy to make even better guitars. No other Selmer-style guitar being made today has a similar history. It would be pointless to deny how all of this factors into the sound, quality and mojo of these guitars. Without doubt, these are the top tier "gypsy guitars" being made today.

    Favino guitars have always had a unique sound. It's darker with a bit more natural reverb (I refer only to the 670mm oval hole models. I don't have much experience with the 12-fret models). They have the same fast attack/fast decay that all properly constructed Selmer type guitars have. But instead of the snippy tone that so many of them have, there is a strength on the bass, and a balance on the mid-ranges that I don't hear in any other guitars. The tone is denser and more complex - these guitars have "growl". I would also say that it's harder to get all a Favino has to offer. You have to play a bit further away from the bridge where the tension is less, and that makes some techniques more difficult. Watch how Matelot played. A good Favino is something special - anyone who ever played one knows this. I would not trade mine for any Selmer I've ever played.

    I've never played a VR so I can't say anything about them. But clearly Dupont was doing all he could to make the best copy of a Selmer he could make. He can acheive that - I have a 12-fret grande bouche Dupont and it sounds almost exactly like a similar Selmer. But this has nothing to do with Favino's guitars, which don't seem to aim for a Selmer sound. The Selmer sound - that's Django's sound. For those who want that, maybe a VR is the best/closest thing. The Favino sound is different - listen to the tone Matelot Ferret gets on the CD "Tziganskaia". That's a Favino in the hands of the guitarist who knew how to find more kinds of sounds in a guitar than anyone else I ever heard. The guitar here does not sound like a Selmer.

    Could someone please explain the fascination with the cranked top? I've played a bunch of Selmers and never seen one with a crank in the top. I examined a handful of old Selmer tops at Dupont's workshop and they were all domed with the apex of the dome in the vicinity of the bridge. I've never seen a guitar with a cranked top, only mandolins. And this style of construction wasn't used much after the development of the Gibson mandolin. Just curious....

    Bob - I just finished another of my ultra-lightweight bridges which is now on my Favino. It's a lot different than the triple-foot model I made for my Saga and does not have the bone saddle. I am real pleased with the results. I'll have some photographs up later in the week. The design still has room for further weight-reduction, too.

    Regards
    Scot
  • fraterfrater Prodigy
    Posts: 763
    I'm not an expert but, if I do remember well, the cranked top was used by Maccaferri in the beginning (probably when Mozzani's influence was stronger...). Actually I think the prototype he presented to Selmer for production had a cranked top.
  • aa New York City✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 800
    can anyone post a picture of the cranked top?
    Www.alexsimonmusic.com
    Learn how to play Gypsy guitar:
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  • Ted GottsegenTed Gottsegen Rowayton, CTModerator
    Posts: 610
    Hi Bob,
    Bob Holo wrote:
    "The Best" as applied to a line of acoustic guitars as a whole? I want some of what we're smoking here on this thread. Don't Bogart that joint, my friend...

    I speak from experience, not from a perspective of attempting to cause friction and disagreements over pedantic "my guitar is better than your guitar..." arguements. You can definitely take or leave it....

    Not necesarily. For the archtop guitar world you've got D'Angelico, D'Aquisto, Benedetto, Monteleone and Campellone. For Mandolins you've got Gilchrist, Monteleone, Smart, Dudenbostel, Paganoni - these are undisputed. For gypsy guitars you've got Favino and Dupont. It's an easy statement for me to make because of the number of guitars in this style that I've owned and played over the last several years. I standby it, believe it and say that they are definitely worth the hype.

    Best,

    Ted
  • Charlie AyersCharlie Ayers Salt Lake CityProdigy
    Posts: 270
    I don't see any Duponts on Francois Charle's site anymore; I wonder what happened to that business relationship?

    Charlie
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