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  • DarrenKingUK 12:25AM

New Favino Website - The Real Deal

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  • fraterfrater Prodigy
    So we're in the price range of a Dupont VRB.... hard choice. Well with the VRB I would have a free bottle of cognac . Does the Favino come with some kind of alcoholic comfort (such as a bottle of aged Italian grappa?) I could definitely use that! :)
  • MichaelHorowitzMichaelHorowitz SeattleAdministrator
    frater wrote:
    So we're in the price range of a Dupont VRB.... hard choice. Well with the VRB I would have a free bottle of cognac . Does the Favino come with some kind of alcoholic comfort (such as a bottle of aged Italian grappa?) I could definitely use that! :)

    I'd say the Vieille Reserve is the only real competition for Favino. Nothing else is really even close. I'll have to admit I thought the Vieille Reserve was a gimmick until I played one. They really are worth the $. The Vieille Reserve is more of a traditional Selmer sound. The new Favinos are nuevo-Gypsy supreme!

    After I've sold my millionth copy of Gypsy Picking I'll probably buy a Vieille Reserve!

    Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I think it's safe to say that J.P. Favino and Maurice Dupont (who did an apprenticeship with Jacques Favino) are the only two luthiers today who have a direct connection to the Selmer lutherie tradition. These guys seem to know something that no one else does....and they have the sound to prove it.

    And the nice thing about these guitars is that unlike the vintage ones, they don't have tons of structural problems. Some of these vintage Busatos and Selmers people pay 10K or more for are totally unplayable!


    'm
  • Ted GottsegenTed Gottsegen Rowayton, CTModerator
    I'd say the Vieille Reserve is the only real competition for Favino. Nothing else is really even close. I'll have to admit I thought the Vieille Reserve was a gimmick until I played one. They really are worth the $. The Vieille Reserve is more of a traditional Selmer sound. The new Favinos are nuevo-Gypsy supreme!

    Maurice really does put everything into those guitars and for the trad sound they are unbeatable!
    Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I think it's safe to say that J.P. Favino and Maurice Dupont (who did an apprenticeship with Jacques Favino) are the only two luthiers today who have a direct connection to the Selmer lutherie tradition. These guys seem to know something that no one else does....and they have the sound to prove it.

    Philippe Monerent took over the Gerome operation from the last brother, but those guitars tend to be a little different anyway so I'd definitely say that you're right. His standard Selmer style has a very dry, trad sound as well, and the archtop hybrids have a very cool, open sound (from one diagonal brace make them unique (these are what Yorgui, Gigi and Mito Loeffler player - a trad version of Gerome is what Tchavolo plays on the Gypsy Reunion and Latcho Drom albums) but Moneret's design sense makes them less attractive to the trad audience, I think.

    What separates Jean-Pierre (and to a much lesser extend Maurice) from the rest of the pack is that they came up with every Gypsy from active from 1968 to the present walking through their shop on any given day offering suggestions and insight into how to make their guitars sound better. You can't buy that kind of experience.

    What I love about Jean-Pierre, in addition to the fact that he's a beautiful person, is that he is truly an artist that takes the utmost pleasure in his work. His output is incredibly small because he does it all himself at an easy pace to ensure quality. Every guitar is tailored to meet the needs of the player it is being built for.
    And the nice thing about these guitars is that unlike the vintage ones, they don't have tons of structural problems. Some of these vintage Busatos and Selmers people pay 10K or more for are totally unplayable!

    Exactly! Even a lot of the old Favinos are in need of massive help. I decided never to buy a "vintage" guitar again because I get really tired of the baggage that they come with. Old Selmers and Busatos, etc are cool especially if you want that bright treble with no mid or bass, but frankly I don't need the added headache of more than routine maintenance that they all seem to require with heavy use.

    Best,

    Ted
  • fraterfrater Prodigy
    I'm more and more convinced I should sell 4/5 guitars and go all the way for a VRB (I'm a trad enthusiast, can't help it!) I noticed though the wood pattern has a bit changed in the latest model (if I'm right the aged wood used for the VRB comes from a Di Mauro's stock Dupont had acquired). I'm wondering if Dupont is still using the same supplies for the VRB tops.

    P.S

    Another guitar using seasoned wood for the top is the Hahl Gitano Super De Luxe (Bireli model) that I suspect being a superb instrument. Never tried one unfortunately.
  • Josh HeggJosh Hegg Tacoma, WAModerator
    I just did some work on a VR yesterday. Great guitar. If you have money and you like the Selmer sound the VR is great. It is one of the only modern guitars I have had in my hands that has the top crank behind the bridge. Also has the Selmer neck to head join. Very cool.


    Cheers,
    Josh
  • Ted GottsegenTed Gottsegen Rowayton, CTModerator
    Hey!
    frater wrote:
    I'm more and more convinced I should sell 4/5 guitars and go all the way for a VRB (I'm a trad enthusiast, can't help it!)

    Than you're making a great choice for a guitar. FYI, VRB is the model designation for Vielle Reserve Brazillian featuring braz. rosewood back and sides. There is an indian rosewood version that is $500. cheaper. I also know of at least one VR made of maple, so you could probably get this model in any wood choice that Selmer originally built with, but don't quote me on this.
    frater wrote:
    I noticed though the wood pattern has a bit changed in the latest model (if I'm right the aged wood used for the VRB comes from a Di Mauro's stock Dupont had acquired). I'm wondering if Dupont is still using the same supplies for the VRB tops.

    My understanding (this is reaching back several years to the time of the purchase) was that Maurice bought only the top stock from DiMauro, not body wood.

    Best,

    Ted
  • fraterfrater Prodigy
    Yes, I meant the grain in the top. A lot of VRs I've seen had this strange wood pattern:

    http://www.gypsyguitars.com/instrument- ... php?id=684

    The latest example I've seen looks like this:

    http://www.gypsyguitars.com/instrument- ... php?id=880

    I wonder if it is still the same Di Mauro stock...

    For 500$, having decided to ruin myself, I would probably go for the Brazilian Rosewood till it is still available!

    For Josh: Dupont is producing now a very limited edition of the MD50 with the top crank behind the bridge: it would sell at around 4000 euro.
  • fraterfrater Prodigy
    Yes, I meant the grain in the top. A lot of VRs I've seen had this strange wood pattern:

    http://www.gypsyguitars.com/instrument- ... php?id=684

    The latest example I've seen looks like this:

    http://www.gypsyguitars.com/instrument- ... php?id=880

    I wonder if it is still the same Di Mauro stock...

    For 500$, having decided to ruin myself, I would probably go for the Brazilian Rosewood till it is still available!

    For Josh: Dupont is producing now a very limited edition of the MD50 with the top crank behind the bridge: it would sell at around 4000 euro.
  • Josh HeggJosh Hegg Tacoma, WAModerator
    That would be cool. I own an MD50B and love it. The VR is great and the MD50B is great and I would buy the MD50B with or without the crank. But now I want one with because that is just cool!

    Cheers,
    Josh
  • fraterfrater Prodigy
    Your MD50B is at Galerie Dupont, right? One of the coolest looking MD50 I've seen!

    I got myself a custom MD 50E sunburst, (probably made for a French endorser of Dupont with a taste for funny tinted guitar and who used to play in Nashville... where I bought the guitar.). I've tried many Dupont, this one is by far the lightest weighting I've played. It was made in 2001 but it sports the golden Gotoh tuning machines Dupont used in the old days. Strange instrument, really with a beautiful "claw bear" top. Perhaps I'll post some pics at Galerie Dupont... if I can find my digital camera!
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