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More Gypsy Etudes?

Rob MacKillopRob MacKillop Edinburgh, Scotland✭✭✭✭
Michael,

I'm enjoying your Unacompanied Django book. I have the easier version of Nuages down pretty much how I want it, and have started on your three Gypsy Etudes, which I'm enjoying. I've just been watching a video of Angelo DeBarre playing solo to open a concert, and some of the lines and chords were very similar to your Étude #1, which is great - it means your studies are based on real-gypsy-world situations, and I am beginning to really get into DeBarre's playing.

So, do you have more Etudes? Some things along the same lines? If not, are there books by others you would recommend for getting deeper into this style?

Comments

  • MichaelHorowitzMichaelHorowitz SeattleAdministrator
    edited December 2014
    @RobMackillop I haven't transcribed any other "etudes" but there should be more than enough in the Unaccompanied Django book to keep you busy for a long time. Just learning all of Django's Improvisations could take years....
  • Rob MacKillopRob MacKillop Edinburgh, Scotland✭✭✭✭
    You are not wrong. More decades than I am likely to have, that's for sure.
  • ChiefbigeasyChiefbigeasy New Orleans, LA✭✭✭ Alves de Puga DR670; Dupont MDC 50; The Loar LH600
    Check out Yaakov Hoter's ballads course at his Gypsy Jazz school site. The video package includes full instructional versions of Nuages, Django's Castle, Tears, plus supporting PDF documentation and a ton of additional information on theory and practical application specifically for these tunes. You should be able to find some short videos of him performing the tunes so you can tell what you're getting. For me, it's one of the best instructional bargains I've ever seen at 40 bucks. I've incorporated two of the tunes into my regular playing and have expanded on what I've learned for each song from this great instructional video package.
  • Rob MacKillopRob MacKillop Edinburgh, Scotland✭✭✭✭
    Good recommendation - I've downloaded a couple of his lessons, and have been impressed.
  • Rob MacKillopRob MacKillop Edinburgh, Scotland✭✭✭✭
    edited December 2014
    @stuart - I know quite well the solo archtop repertoire outside of GJ, as you can see from my website: robmackillop.net/guitar/jazz/plectrum-guitar/

    I wonder how this stuff will sound on a GJ guitar...I'll find out in the Spring.

    I have the DeBarre book on order (my spellchecker insists on giving him a capital B ).

    Thanks.
    None
  • pickitjohnpickitjohn South Texas Corpus, San Antonio, AustinVirtuoso Patenotte 260
    @RobMacKillop

    Great Website, generous man, Thanks for all the Videos, Lessons,Info, and History. ( Another Place to hang when I got some Free Time ) :-bd

    What is the Archtop in your Avatar Picture.

    :peace:
    pick on

    pickitjohn
  • Rob MacKillopRob MacKillop Edinburgh, Scotland✭✭✭✭
    Thanks, John. I like digging up forgotten stuff, and finding it still seems relevant somehow.

    I found that archtop in a junk shop. It's a Columbian Major, a short-lived branch of Harmony Guitars in the States. They were imported into Britain in only one year: 1939, when the war put an end to it as a model. So it's quite rare. It was never of a Gibson quality, but it looks gorgeous. The top seems to be carved spruce, which is great, and the back and sides are plywood, with, amusingly, figuring painted on. The neck is huge, fat and heavy, and quite difficult to get around on. Of course, I'm blaming it for my not being able to play fast ;-) I'm using it for gypsy jazz, until I get my Castelluccia in mid April.
  • Rob MacKillopRob MacKillop Edinburgh, Scotland✭✭✭✭
    Ha, I don't feel so confidant, Stuart. I've just received the Debarre book. I haven't had time to work on it, but it looks a good level for me. Getting the right feel, while still being able to express yourself, is a difficult thing, but I enjoy such challenges. And then there is always the challenge of speed playing, which has never come natural to me. I'm enjoying learning the rest-stroke technique, which I've never consciously used before. We shall see...
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