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Pre-amp with Acoustic amp with pre-amp and eq.'s-Redundant?

PassacagliaPassacaglia Madison, WI✭✭✭✭
Hi all -

OK, another question on amplification, from un naïf. A friend was over yesterday, a skilled and experienced player, bandleader who plays out a lot. I've got a good amp, 2 channels, channel two (mic channel) has a graphic equalizer, notch filter, phase shift, phantom power, lots of options.

He generally uses his amp as a stage monitor. He sets up the sound how he wants it as a monitor, tweaking his amp graphics eq., etc. He sends signal out to the board on a pre-eq. output - totally flat. This gives him control over the monitor - his amp - and the sound person a totally flat signal to work from. He prefers things this way.

Even if I weren't to go this way, and sent out through the post-EQ line, my main question still remains (and sorry if I've spaced its answer in recent threads), given the amp's pre-amp and contouring ability, what purpose does something like the Baggs serve?

My friend felt the Para was redundant, unneeded, because the amp itself has the same capabilities.

Edit: is it because the Baggs also acts as a DI? And if so, could one go: guitar-baggs-channel 2 (mic), trimmed and contoured with the Baggs (or amp); out via pre-eq., and the board gets the DI from the Baggs being between the guitar and amp - or does it need to be after the out from the amp, balanced XLR out-Baggs DI-Board?
pas encore, j'erre toujours.

Comments

  • StevearenoSteveareno ✭✭✭
    Posts: 349
    I got a good deal on a used Baggs DI, so grabbed it, just in case I ever play out again. Mainly to boost the signal of the pickup in my Dell Arte. I think it's a McIntyre. Very low gain, but sounds good and doesn't feed back. Just not alot of gain. The DI can boost the gain, dial in the tone and notch out frequencies that may be prone to feedback from different amps or rooms. You can tweak all that stuff before the signal hits the amp or PA. I've also got a Schertler Basik, which delivers a hotter signal and more high end. Great to easily stick on and off any guitar, or string instrument. I can push back the gain on the pre-amp and soften the tone. If the amp has a lot of controls, you may not need it. Extra gadgets are a hassle and too many pedals look dumb on stage, but a pre-amp could be good to have on hand when needed.
    Swang on,
  • jimvencejimvence Austin, TX✭✭
    Posts: 73
    Most likely, you will want a pre-amp. Most modern amplifiers have the pre-amp sections you describe, but they will not compensate for the level of say, a passive transducer type pickup. That is one reason why you see "active" and "passive" versions of their pickup, and that their active versions need a battery (power supply).
  • PassacagliaPassacaglia Madison, WI✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 1,283
    Thanks guys. I should have said, I'm a rhythm guy, expect it's what I'm going to be. I'm glad I have the Stimer (thank you again Tedd), but don't expect to be using it much out, if at all, don't like its tone on rhythm. Played around today with my AT831B and Ischell, but haven't had a chance to push either. Today I just ran into the amp without the Para Baggs.

    Appreciate your thoughts. I suppose like everything else in this music, nothing like just trying it out. I'd love to push the system, and really see what each option can do.

    Thanks again,

    Paul
    pas encore, j'erre toujours.
  • MichaelHorowitzMichaelHorowitz SeattleAdministrator
    Posts: 5,768
    I'm glad I have the Stimer (thank you again Tedd), but don't expect to be using it much out, if at all, don't like its tone on rhythm.

    You can get a good rhythm sound with a Stimer, you just have to play a little differently. The trick is to lay off the bass strings. Try focusing your strumming more on the treble strings and it usually sounds great.

    'm
  • PassacagliaPassacaglia Madison, WI✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 1,283
    I'm glad I have the Stimer (thank you again Tedd), but don't expect to be using it much out, if at all, don't like its tone on rhythm.

    You can get a good rhythm sound with a Stimer, you just have to play a little differently. The trick is to lay off the bass strings. Try focusing your strumming more on the treble strings and it usually sounds great.

    'm

    Hahaha - Michael, I've worked my tail off to make my rhythm sound passably pleasing.....in the "light and dry" spiritual house. With an Ischell and an AT831B, you think this poor besotted soul is going to start monkeying around with it now! :shock: :D
    pas encore, j'erre toujours.
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