DjangoBooks.com

Welcome to our Community!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Related Discussions

Who's Online (0)

Today's Birthdays

indigocat t-bird cearle LyddleSwing baenjo petermancomau

Trimus (and other pick questions)

pallopennapallopenna Rhode IslandNew
Does anyone use Trimus picks? I'm curious to see people's assessments.

Also, does anyone use really round-edged picks (like mando-style picks)?
Reject the null hypothesis.

Comments

  • pdaiglepdaigle Montreal, QCNew
    Posts: 233
    I don't onw a Trimus as it would probably have too pointy of an edge for me.

    I tried an M350 which I really liked: it has a nice beveled rounded edge and I found it was very close in thickness and edge shape to a handmade tortoise shell pick Angelo Debarre was using when he came to Montreal in 2000 and that I had a chance to try.

    I also use a Button when I practice soloing as I find it forces me to have a proper resstroke attack and isn't as forgiving when you cheat (i.e it won't produce a sound).

    Michel Wegen made a custom Fatone for me with a more rounded edge also which is awesome! I find I can get a good tone out of it for soloing and use it for rhythm also.
  • just the bassplayerjust the bassplayer Huntington, NYNew
    Posts: 40
    Yes, I have a Trimus, as well as the Wegen 350, a the Fatone 5mm, and a collection of rounded mandolin picks. I started with the heavy mandolin picks form Golden Gate, and a Dawg pick.

    The mandolin picks had good tone but little volume (in my hand). I also found that they hurt my wrist - probably from years of abuse of using a standard Fender type heavy pick to play my Hofner bass. Things got so bad that I had to abandon the picks for the bass, and that's all for the better.

    The Wegen picks have never caused me any wrist pains when learning the Gypsy rest stroke technique. I consider this a minor miracle. It's probably because of the correct ergonomic angles coupled with trying to follow Michael Horowitz's instructions religiously. For me, it's been like learning a new language with out any familiar roots to draw from past experience. But, it works, with lots of practice, careful listening, and the good directions from other gypsy style players, who post on sites like this one.

    I favor the Fatone, followed by the Trimus, though my fellow guitar player favors the Wegen 350 - I'm sure that's the most popular. I'm not a fast lead player, but my rhythm is fairly good. When I do play lead parts, the tone is excellent with the Wegens. The tone of the Wegans is also very good for rhythm work as well. The Fatone gives me a very nice thick warm sound without being muddy. My guitar is a Gitane D-500 with a #3 Dupont bridge, light Argentine strings , and a leather bound (underside) tail-piece.
    As we know from true gypsy players, you don't need to use a Wegen.

    Michael
  • ViejoVatoViejoVato New
    Posts: 80
    Hello ...
    I have tried most of the Wegen picks.. michael even made me one that had an angled groove on the back to match my index finger ... nothing ever quite felt good until I got a trimus 350 ... The weight is good and i can always feel my way around the pick.. so when playing rhythm I have the rounded part closest to the strings and then i can just twist it a bit and i've got the point in place for some rather amateurish lead licks ...
    Michael is one of the sponsers of Django fest South West ...
    c,mon out for good music right outside Tucson May 12 - 14th
    www.dfsw.net

    cheers,
    miller
    "I don't know where I'm going but I'm on my way"
    my granny 'Meme' Foster circa 1998 at age 102
    Django Jerry Jam - home grown GJ & Dead Ahead pickin'
    http://www.DjangoJerryJam.com
  • lukejazzlukejazz Natchitoches, Louisiana✭✭✭ Dunn Belleville
    Posts: 22
    I got a trimus when they first came out and it really helped me find "the sound". I think a lot of that comes from the way you hold the pick and for some reason the shape of the Trimus made me hold the pick at a better angle. Later on once I got a better feel for how to hold the pick I switched to the standard Gypsy Jazz because it was lighter and a little more controllable. The Trimus was more like having "training wheels" on for me. Really just exactly what I needed at the time.

    lukejazz
Sign In or Register to comment.
Home  |  Forum  |  Blog  |  Contact  |  206-528-9873
The Premier Gypsy Jazz Marketplace
DjangoBooks.com
USD CAD GBP EUR AUD
USD CAD GBP EUR AUD
Banner Adverts
Sell Your Guitar
© 2019 DjangoBooks.com, all rights reserved worldwide.
Software: Kryptronic eCommerce, Copyright 1999-2019 Kryptronic, Inc. Exec Time: 0.043242 Seconds Memory Usage: 3.449112 Megabytes
Kryptronic