DjangoBooks.com

Welcome to our Community!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Related Discussions

Who's Online (0)

Today's Birthdays

Mischa gypsymyk jensmolander RussellBib

Entry level GJ guitar? Newbie Q.

kevorkazitokevorkazito Winnipeg Manitoba Canada✭✭
I was just wondering if there is such a thing as an entry level GJ guitar.

The ones that I can find seem to carry some hefty price tags.

As a beginner I'm not ready to spend big $$, yet I would like to have a guitar that will embody the spirit of the GJ tone and style.

Currently, I am using a Joe Pass Emperor II.

Also, could I just put GJ strings on my acoustic guitar and get the proper vibe and timbre?
«13

Comments

  • hanear21hanear21
    Posts: 62
    There's a lot of talk about the Cigano GJ-10 guitar being an excellent value for the price. You can get it from this website for $330. Do a forum search for that and you'll find a lot of information about them.

    Here's one positive review: viewtopic.php?f=9&t=6764&p=35102&hilit=Cigano#p35102

    It seems like they are great as long as you have a little work done on them, which you can do right when you order from this website :D
  • kevorkazitokevorkazito Winnipeg Manitoba Canada✭✭
    Posts: 178
    I read that post right after I placed my query.

    What kind of work does it need? Like new tuning pegs?
  • hanear21hanear21
    Posts: 62
    I don't know exactly everything that is done but I think the major work includes leveling the frets and replacing the bridge since they often ship with really high/low actions and have some buzzing problems, this would cost between $100 - 200.

    That said, I've heard people say it was great right out of the box.
  • klaatuklaatu Nova ScotiaProdigy Rodrigo Shopis D'Artagnan, 1950s Jacques Castelluccia
    Posts: 1,645
    If you can afford a little more, the Altamira M01 is a great starting guitar, with very authentic sound.
    Benny

    "It's a great feeling to be dealing with material which is better than yourself, that you know you can never live up to."
    -- Orson Welles
  • Tele295Tele295 San Buenaventura (Latcho Drom), CA✭✭✭ Gitane DG300, D500
    Posts: 629
    Our Cigano GJ-15 was good right out of the box. Just need to replace those lousy stock strings with some Argentines, and get a proper gypsy pick.

    Currently, I am using a Joe Pass Emperor II.

    Also, could I just put GJ strings on my acoustic guitar and get the proper vibe and timbre?

    No - it's more than just the strings. The whole instrument behaves differently than American guitars. As Django himself once said about American guitars "Don't talk to me about their pots!"
    Jill Martini Soiree - Gypsy Swing & Cocktail Jazz
    http://www.jillmartinisoiree.com
  • PassacagliaPassacaglia Madison, WI✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 1,283
    Tele295 wrote:
    No - it's more than just the strings. The whole instrument behaves differently than American guitars. As Django himself once said about American guitars "Don't talk to me about their pots!"

    Wow, too funny....timing! Been re-reading Michael Dregni's book (Gypsy Jazz: In Search of Django Reinhardt and the Soul of Gypsy Swing), and literally just closed the chapter on "Les Guitares à Moustaches...." no kidding, about 2 minutes ago. From page 119, when Charles Delaunay rejoined Django's Selmer to the Master's hands, in NY:
    django wrote:
    "Mon frère, all the Americans will wish they could play on this guitar! At least it's got tone, you can hear the chords like you can on the piano. Don't talk to me anymore about their casseroles - their tinpot guitars."

    Vive les Guitares à Moustaches! :D
    pas encore, j'erre toujours.
  • kevorkazitokevorkazito Winnipeg Manitoba Canada✭✭
    Posts: 178
    klaatu wrote:
    If you can afford a little more, the Altamira M01 is a great starting guitar, with very authentic sound.

    That's a nice one. I can afford a bit more... not $7k like my research was leading me too. I'll try to find a demo on youtube of it.

    I have had many entry level guitars. I'm definitely a proponent of having a great instrument so I will make a sacrifice to get the best one I can get.

    It sure is pretty... I luv the look of it! thanks K!
  • kevorkazitokevorkazito Winnipeg Manitoba Canada✭✭
    Posts: 178
    hanear21 wrote:
    I don't know exactly everything that is done but I think the major work includes leveling the frets and replacing the bridge since they often ship with really high/low actions and have some buzzing problems, this would cost between $100 - 200.

    That said, I've heard people say it was great right out of the box.

    Good to know, thank you!
  • kevorkazitokevorkazito Winnipeg Manitoba Canada✭✭
    Posts: 178

    No - it's more than just the strings. The whole instrument behaves differently than American guitars. As Django himself once said about American guitars "Don't talk to me about their pots!"

    I figured that would be the case. Just hoping (and grasping a bit).
  • kevorkazitokevorkazito Winnipeg Manitoba Canada✭✭
    Posts: 178

    Wow, too funny....timing! Been re-reading Michael Dregni's book (Gypsy Jazz: In Search of Django Reinhardt and the Soul of Gypsy Swing), and literally just closed the chapter on "Les Guitares à Moustaches...." no kidding, about 2 minutes ago. From page 119, when Charles Delaunay rejoined Django's Selmer to the Master's hands, in NY:


    Vive les Guitares à Moustaches! :D

    I just ordered that book from Amazon... look forward to reading it.
Sign In or Register to comment.
Home  |  Forum  |  Blog  |  Contact  |  206-528-9873
Follow Us
The Premier Gypsy Jazz Marketplace
DjangoBooks.com
Search
Banner Adverts
Sell Your Guitar
Follow Us
© 2019 DjangoBooks.com, all rights reserved worldwide.
Software: Kryptronic eCommerce, Copyright 1999-2019 Kryptronic, Inc. Exec Time: 0.044239 Seconds Memory Usage: 3.230377 Megabytes
Kryptronic